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Development of Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta in the Intermediate host Tribolium confusum



Development of Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta in the Intermediate host Tribolium confusum



Univ California Publ Zool 59(9): 549-580



The pattern of larval development of the tapeworms H. diminuta and H. nana was studied in the intermediate host T confusum, the confused flour beetle, maintained at 30[degree]C. It has been found possible to establish 5 stages in the growth of these larvae: (1) Initial form observed in the hemocoel, a spherical mass of cells with oncosphere hooks as in the penetrating hexacanth. (2) Appearance of an eccentric cavity within the spherical larva, accompanied by considerable growth. (3) Elongation and increased growth, extension of the cavity, and division of body into 2 or 3 regions: fore-body (future scolex), showing most active growth; mid-body, containing the expanding cavity; hind-body, or tail (not yet fully formed in H. nana, giving this species a 2-part body division). (4) Withdrawal of the partially differentiated scolex into the midbody. (5) Completion of development of the scolex accompanied by continuous tail growth even after the infective state is reached. A detailed consideration of these stages in the 2 species is given. Some of the developmental differences between them include a more rapid early growth of H. diminuta, produc-ing a greater total size; a more rapid but somewhat more variable morphogenesis in H. nana; and an earlier appearance and a greater development of the tail in H. diminuta. The total cysticercoid size of H. diminuta at all stages of cysticercoid development is roughly twice that of H. nana, whereas the scolex proper of H. nana is considerably larger than that of H. diminuta and occupies a much greater proportion of the cysticercoid cavity. Factors responsible for the variability observed are discussed in terms of a physiological crowding effect in the beetle host.

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