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Efficacy of alphacypermethrin applied to cattle and sheep against the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus



Efficacy of alphacypermethrin applied to cattle and sheep against the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus



Veterinary Parasitology 163(1-2): 110-114



The recent emergence of bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe, has led to an urgent need to identify methods to control the Culicoides biting midges that transmit it. Here, an in vitro assay was used to assess the effects of the proprietary pyrethroid insecticide alphacypermethrin applied to cattle and sheep (Dysect Cattle Pour-On, Dysect Sheep Pour-On; Ford Dodge Animal Health) against the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Hair or wool was collected from the back, belly and legs of animals immediately prior to treatment and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after treatment, and also from untreated controls. In the laboratory assay groups of 10 adult females C. nubeculosus were exposed to 0.5 g of hair or wool for 3 min. In all cases, no mortality was observed in the pre-treatment sample or the untreated controls. In the post-treatment samples, for both cattle and sheep mortality was close to 100% 7 days after treatment. For cattle, treatment effect persisted for up to 21 days post-treatment, following which the mortality rate following exposure to hair samples declined. In contrast, for sheep, mortality levels declined more slowly, and approximately 50% mortality was still observed 35 days after treatment. There was no significant difference in the kill rate for wool collected from the back, belly or legs of either sheep or cattle. The results demonstrate the potential for pour-on insecticide treatment to offer a degree of mitigation to livestock against onward transmission from infected animals--and in particular demonstrate that sufficient compound is able to reach the lower legs to kill in contact midges. The practical issues associated with achieving adequate protection are discussed.

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Accession: 024588927

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19398160

DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2009.03.041


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