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Organization of the shoot of Pseudotsuga taxifolia Britt. II. Vascularization



Organization of the shoot of Pseudotsuga taxifolia Britt. II. Vascularization



American Journal of Botany 34(5): 272-280



Vascular development in Douglas fir is correlated with seasonal growth activity. Procambium development is continuously acropetal, precociously developing strands being most numerous during the formation of the new bud in summer and almost non-existent at dormancy. Procambium in the dormant bud is tangentially storied. As the bud elongates in spring, vascular phenomena occur almost simultaneously in all its bundles, which are common to stem and leaf. The bundles enlarge gradually to meet at their edges without the formation of a distinct interfascicular cambium. Protophloem develops acropetally and is present in the bundles to the older primordia of the dormant bud, the first protophloem lacking noticeable sieve fields. No xylem is found in the bud until the latter elongates; then protoxylem differentiation occurs rapidly at isolated areas along the leaf traces. Protoxylem generally has spiral wall thickenings in elongating regions, but in the non-elongating crown it. may have spiral, transitional, or pitted thickenings. Metaxylem has spiral thickenings interspersed with bordered pits. The numerous cataphyll traces are relatively poorly developed. Axillary buds are not detectable at dormancy. During shoot elongation, they are recognizable as deeply-staining areas in certain leaf axils. They may be considered as reserved meristems, which later develop primordia and vascular bundles.

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Organization Of The Shoot Of Pseudotsuga Taxifolia (Lamb.) Britt. Ii. Vascularization. American Journal of Botany 34(5): 272-280, 1947

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