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Studies on the possibilities of devil's shoestring and other native species of Tephrosia as commercial sources of insecticides



Studies on the possibilities of devil's shoestring and other native species of Tephrosia as commercial sources of insecticides



U S Dept Agric Tech Bull 595: 1-40



The insecticidal value of the roots of T. v., native to the south and southeast, which are reported to contain rotenone, varies greatly and only roots from sections in NE Texas, SW Georgia and NE Florida are sufficiently toxic to suggest commercial usefulness. Some evidence was found that soil and other environment modify the quality of the roots but the capacity to produce rotenone is probably also a genetic character. Of the 12 native spp. studied, only 1[long dash]T. latidens of NW Florida[long dash]shows promise of usefulness as source of rotenone. Miscellaneous studies in connection with the culture of T. v. showed that the rotenone is in the root, occasionally in the seed and never in the herbage; that it occurs in the root wood rather than in the root bark; that the rotenone content of a given plant growing undisturbed is not likely to vary much during the season and from yr. to yr.

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Related references

Studies on the Possibilities of Devil's Shoestring (Tephrosia virginiana) and other Native Speeies of Tephrosia as Commercial Sources of Insecticides. Tech. Bull. U.S. Dep. Agric, Washington, D.C., 595, 40, 1938

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