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The development of the virus of yellow fever in haemagogus mosquitoes



The development of the virus of yellow fever in haemagogus mosquitoes



American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 26(5): 585-605



The effect of temp. on virus development in haemagogus mosquitoes was studied by the inoculation in mouse groups of individual mosquitoes at regular intervals after the infectious meal and by the titration of pools of mosquitoes. It was found that there was an initial period of virus loss, followed by a period of virus gain, the rates in both cases depending on the temp. The % of mosquitoes becoming infected and the length of the incubation period seemed also to be a function of the amount of virus ingested with the infectious meal. There is some evidence that infection at a given temp. and given virus dosage depends in part on the characteristics of the individual mosquito. [t was difficult to infect haemagogus mosquitoes on saimiri monkeys inoculated with pantropic virus strains modified by serial passage in mice. With the evidence at hand it is impossible to decide how much this was due to the lower titers of virus circulated by such monkeys, and how much to possible modification of the ability of the virus particles to invade mosquito tissue. There was considerable variation among individual mosquitoes of the same lot in the time at which they became infective; but once a mosquito became infective it remained so for life. The minimum incubation period was found to be 28 days at 25[degree]C, 23 days in mosquitoes kept for 20 hrs. daily at 25[degree] and 4 hrs. daily at 30[degree]; 12 days for a similar alteration of 25[degree]-35[degree]; and 10 days at a constant temp. of 30[degree]. The very favorable results obtained with mosquitoes alternated between 25[degree] (20 hrs.) and 35[degree] (4 hrs.) suggest that relatively short exposures to high temps. in nature may greatly accelerate virus development.

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Accession: 025727079

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PMID: 21003267


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