Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and propylene glycol monomethyl ether: metabolism, disposition, and subchronic inhalation toxicity studies

Miller, R.R.; Hermann, E.A.; Young, J.T.; Landry, T.D.; Calhoun, L.L.

Environmental Health Perspectives 57: 233-239

1984


ISSN/ISBN: 0091-6765
PMID: 6499808
DOI: 10.1289/ehp.8457233
Accession: 028279014

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Abstract
Short-term and subchronic vapor inhalation studies have shown that there are pronounced differences in the toxicological properties of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME). Overexposure to EGME has resulted in adverse effects on testes, bone marrow and lymphoid tissues in laboratory animals. PGME does not affect these tissues, and instead, overexposure to PGME has been associated with increases in liver weight and central nervous system depression. EGME is primarily oxidized to methoxyacetic acid in male rats, while PGME apparently undergoes O-demethylation to form propylene glycol. Since methoxyacetic acid has been shown to have the same spectrum of toxicity as EGME in male rats, the observed differences in the toxicological properties of EGME and PGME are thought to be due to the fact that the two materials are biotransformed via different routes to different types of metabolites.