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Role of alternative classical and terminal complement components in bacterial killing and lipopolysaccharide release



Role of alternative classical and terminal complement components in bacterial killing and lipopolysaccharide release



Abstracts of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology 86: 54




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