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Aging experiments on clay materials with sulfuric water and salty-bromide-iodine water for the preparation of thermal peloid muds and for dermatological treatments



Aging experiments on clay materials with sulfuric water and salty-bromide-iodine water for the preparation of thermal peloid muds and for dermatological treatments



Mineralogica et Petrographica Acta 42(Pages 267-275



Tests have been carried out with the aim of verifying the effects of ageing treatments on clayey geomaterials used for the formulation of masks for recovering cutaneous diseases, and of thermal "peloid" muds applied in the therapy of pathologies as rheumatism, arthrosis, bone-muscle traumas (also due to sport performances). The starting clayey blend consisted of a clay exploited in the locality of Pontestura/AL (Veniale & Setti 1996), mixed with a Na-bentonite (ratio 1:1). The ageing procedures (lasting 3 months) have involved the use of both sulphurous water (mud for dermatological masks) and bromic-iodic-salty water (thermal mud for rheumatic, arthrosic and bone-muscle traumatic pathologies). The mineralogical, physico-chemical and rheological modifications caused by the different ageing treatments resulted rather slight: (i) sulphurous water has degraded some constituents of the starting clayey admixture (chlorite, illite/smectite and feldspars) into smectite; (ii) bromic-iodic-salty water has partly "blocked" the interlayer space of smectite present in the starting material, thus transformed into "intergrade" and/or chlorite. As a consequence, the cation exchange capacity of the aged muds increased (i) or decreased (ii), respectively. Calcite was partly dissolved by sulphurous water, whereas doubtful is the behaviour of dolomite. Grain-size distribution has been slightly affected by the ageing treatments with an increase of the finer fractions (<63 mu m = 93%), higher after treatment with sulphurous water. Consistency parameters (liquid and plastic limits, plastic index), in any case and condition, are characteristic for muds with good workability. Furthermore, the relatively easy retention of water gives a good thermal capacity to the muds, and slows down the heat release.

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Accession: 029942450

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