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Alcohol screening practices of primary care physicians in eastern North Carolina



Alcohol screening practices of primary care physicians in eastern North Carolina



Alcohol 11(6): 489-492



In our study, 616 primary care physicians of eastern North Carolina were surveyed for screening practices for detection of alcoholism in their patient population. We defined primary care as Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics and Psychiatry. We defined eastern North Carolina as the 29 counties that Pitt County Memorial Hospital serves. In our survey we found that eastern North Carolina is medically underserved as well as having less resources for referral and consultation. In response to the questionnaire, we found that most physicians agreed on some numerical value for drinks per day, social drinks, and drinks per week while pregnant. Values for drinks per week and weekend binges generally reflected significant tolerance for heavy drinking behavior. We also found that physicians of the same specialty commonly agreed on answers but when compared to other specialties they differed. Physicians preferred personal and clinical screening methods to questionnaires such as CAGE. Most physicians did not prescribe Antabuse but did suggest to their patients to cut down on drinking. Physicians felt that their patients needed more education and support from the community as well as intervention at an early age. We conclude that physicians should receive more education concerning alcoholism and substance abuse.

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Accession: 029953651

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 7865149

DOI: 10.1016/0741-8329(94)90073-6


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