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Central venous oxygen saturation does not correlate with the venous oxygen saturation at the surgical site during abdominal surgery



Central venous oxygen saturation does not correlate with the venous oxygen saturation at the surgical site during abdominal surgery



Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation 39(1-4): 409-415



Introduction: Measurement of central venous oxygen saturation has become a surrogate parameter for fluid administration, blood transfusions and treatment with catecholamines in ( early) goal directed therapy in the treatment of acute septic patients. These strategies are not easily transferred to the postoperative management of abdominal surgery due to the different conditions in surgical patients.Materials and methods: A study population of 15 patients ( 8 females/ 7 males) underwent elective major abdominal surgery: 6 gastrectomies, 5 major liver resections and 4 lower anterior rectum resections. Surgery was performed for primary or secondary malignancy. The patients' age was 65.4 +/- 12.7 ( mean +/- standard deviation, range 44-84, median 62) years. Blood samples were taken intraoperatively from indwelling central venous lines as well as from draining veins at the surgical site. Blood gas analyses to determine the oxygen saturations were performed immediately. All patients were operated in standardized general anesthesia including epidural analgesia and in a balanced volume status.Results: Central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in blood from the draining veins of the surgical site showed a wide range with high intra- and interindividual differences intraoperatively. Overall, at most time points no correlation between the two oxygen saturations could be detected in three operation types. A significant correlation was only observed at one time point during liver resections.Conclusion: Our results show a lack of correlation between central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in the draining veins of the surgical site during major abdominal surgery. Measurement of central venous oxygen saturations does not seem to be a good surrogate for the local oxygen supply in the field of interest in major abdominal surgery even under standardized conditions.

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Accession: 030448431

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PMID: 18503153


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