EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Leaf toughness in Quercus agrifolia and its effects on tissue selection by first instars of Phryganidia californica and Bucculatrix albertiella



Leaf toughness in Quercus agrifolia and its effects on tissue selection by first instars of Phryganidia californica and Bucculatrix albertiella



Annals of the Entomological Society of America 89(1): 109-121



Causes of toughness in mature leaves of coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Nee, were identified and quantified, their effects on early instars of the California oakworm (Phryganidia californica Packard) were determined, and the strategies used by the larvae for successful feeding on tough leaves were compared with those used by an oak leaf skeletonizer (Bucculatrix albertiella Braun). Histological methods showed that tissue thickness, bundlesheath extensions, areoles, and lignin contributed to leaf toughness. At the abaxial surface, the extensions were significantly larger, areole areas significantly smaller, and lignins were concentrated in the lower epidermal tissues. The abaxial surface and adaxial areas near the primary vein were significantly harder than other leaf areas measured with a penetrometer, and this was correlated with structural differences. P. californica larvae confined to the tougher abaxial surface were unable to reach the palisade cells because of the insects' head capsule and mandibular morphology. These larvae weighed significantly less than adaxial feeders. On the adaxial surface, larvae fed near the marginal vein and preferred the palisade tissue. The gape and dimensions of the mandibles restricted the method and depth of feeding within an areole. In contrast, B. albertiella was not affected by most of the components of leaf toughness; the morphology of the head capsule permitted larvae to feed from the tougher surface.

(PDF 0-2 workdays service: $29.90)

Accession: 032130920

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

Leaf toughness in Quercus agrifolia and its effects on tissue selection by first instars of Phryganidia californica (Lepidoptera: Dioptidae) and Bucculatrix albertiella (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America. January; 891: 109-121, 1996

Seasonal variation in leaf chemistry of the coast live oak Quercus agrifolia and implications for the California oak moth Phryganidia californica. Oecologia (Berlin): 794: 439-445, 1989

Key to the pupal parasites of California oakworm, Phryganidia californica (Lepidoptera: Dioptidae), based on larval exuviae Quercus agrifolia, biological control. Pan Pacific entomologist 58(1): 42-47, 1982

Oakworms and what to do about them Phryganidia californica infesting Quercus. Fremontia 10(2): 21-23, 1982

Mating selection in the california oak moth leipodoptera dioptidae phryganidia californica. Evolution: 55-58, 1969

Effect of food quality, larval density, and photoperiod on the feeding rate of the California oakworm (Lepidoptera: Dioptidae) Phryganida californica, Quercus agrifolia. Environmental entomology 12(3): 792-798, 1983

Species diversity in native woodland stands, of Quercus agrifolia and Umbellularia californica and introduced stands of Eucalyptus globulus. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America 77(3 SUPPL PART 2): 391, 1996

Seven new lepidoterous leaf-miners associated with Quercus agrifolia (Heliozelidae, Gracilariidae). 1971

Seven new lepidopterous leaf-miners associatedwith Quercus agrifolia (Heliozelidae, Gracilariidae). J. Soc: long dash211, 1971

Control of early larval stages of the california oakworm phryganidia californica by low concentrations of bacillus thuringiensis applied to lower leaf surfaces. Journal of Economic Entomology 73(2): 344-346, 1980

The effect of urbanization on the quality of remnant habitats for leaf-mining Lepidoptera on Quercus agrifolia. Ecography ember; 26(6): 777-787, 2003

Seasonal variation of leaf wax n-alkane production and δ(2)H values from the evergreen oak tree, Quercus agrifolia. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies 51(1): 124-142, 2016

Ecology and host-specificity of parasitoids of leaf-mining Lepidoptera on Quercus agrifolia (Fagaceae) in California. Dissertation Abstracts International B Sciences and Engineering, 416: 2050, 1980

Leaf cutting ants atta texana and live oak quercus fusiformis the role of leaf toughness in seasonal and intraspecific host choice. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 32(2): 146-150, 1982

Leaf-cutting ants and live oak: the role of leaf toughness in seasonal and intraspecific host choice Atta texana, Quercus fusiformis, Texas. Entomologia experimentalis et applicata2(2): 146-150, 1982