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Predation by Podisus maculiventris Hemiptera Pentatomidae on Plutella xylostella Lepidoptera Plutellidae larvae parasitized by Cotesia plutellae Hymenoptera Braconidae and its impact on cabbage



Predation by Podisus maculiventris Hemiptera Pentatomidae on Plutella xylostella Lepidoptera Plutellidae larvae parasitized by Cotesia plutellae Hymenoptera Braconidae and its impact on cabbage



Biological Control 45(3): 386-395



Biological control offers potentially effective suppression of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a serious pest of Brassica crops. Little is known of whether multiple natural enemies have additive, antagonistic, or synergistic effects on DBM populations. No-choice and choice tests were conducted to assess predation by Podisus maculiventris on DBM larvae parasitized by Cotesia plutellae and unparasitized larvae. In no-choice tests, P. maculiventris preyed on greater numbers of parasitized than unparasitized larvae and greater numbers of young larvae than old larvae. In choice tests with early third instar DBM, there was no difference in predation between parasitized or unparasitized larvae. However, in choice tests with older prey, P. maculiventris preyed on more parasitized than unparasitized larvae. Two field studies were conducted to test if this predator and parasitoid have additive, antagonistic or synergistic effects on DBM populations and plant damage in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). In 2002, DBM populations were significantly lower in the presence of C plutellae but not in the presence of P. maculiventris. There was not a significant interaction between the natural enemies. Plant damage was reduced only with C phitellae. In 2003, DBM populations were significantly lower in the presence of C phitellae and P. maculiventris, although the combination of natural enemies did not lead to a non-additive interaction. Plant damage was unaffected by the presence of either natural enemy. Because of its greater predation on parasitized larvae, P. maculiventris could be an intraguild predator of C plutellae. Yet, their overall combined effect in the field was additive rather than antagonistic.

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Accession: 032902141

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DOI: 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2008.02.008


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