+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Synchronization of hatching date with budburst of individual host trees in the winter moth and its fitness consequences



Synchronization of hatching date with budburst of individual host trees in the winter moth and its fitness consequences



Journal of Animal Ecology 66(1): 113-121



1. Due to varying selection pressures among host individuals, herbivorous insects may show local adaptation at the individual level. In the winter moth, synchrony of egg hatching and host tree (Quercus robur L.) budburst may have important fitness consequences and, therefore, may result in a local adaptation to the hosts phenology. However, relatively high gene flow levels may disrupt such a fine-scale adaption. 2. We determined hatching dates of clutches laid by females collected during copulation, and variation in budburst dates of the trees on which these couples were collected. 3. In our study area, budburst date showed substantial variation within years and areas, as the first and last tree to start leafing were separated by up to 26 days. Relative budburst dates of individual trees were constant between years. Average hatching dates differed significantly among clutches and varied over 30 days, a range comparable to that of budburst. 4. Hatching dates were positively associated with budburst of the respective trees indicating individual synchrony, which may be mediated by two mechanisms. First, early active adults are captured more frequently on early trees and late adults on late trees. As adult activity period is positively correlated with date of egg hatch, early clutches will tend to be laid on earlier trees while late clutches will be laid more frequently on late trees. Secondly, a presumed active choice mechanism may additionally increases individual host synchronization. Yet, the latter requires further study. 5. Our data support that synchronization of larval hatching with host budburst is adaptive as it increases adult size and thus expected fitness.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 033613834

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Synchronization of hatching date with budburst of individual host trees (Quercus robur) in the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) and its fitness consequences. Journal of Animal Ecology 66(1): 113-121, 1997

Synchronization of larval emergence in winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) and budburst in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) under simulated climate change. Ecological Entomology 21(4): 335-343, 1996

Outbreaks of the winter moth on sitka spruce in Scotland are not influenced by nutrient deficiencies of trees, tree budburst, or pupal predation. Oecologia (Berlin): 861: 62-69, 1991

Outbreaks of the winter moth on sitka spruce in scotland uk are not influenced by nutrient deficiencies of trees tree budburst or pupal predation. Oecologia 86(1): 62-69, 1991

Outbreaks of the winter moth on Sitka Spruce in Scotland are not influenced by nutrient deficiencies of trees, tree budburst, or pupal predation. Oecologia 86(1): 62-69, 1991

Fitness Consequences of Mating System, Seed Weight, and Emergence Date in a Winter Annual, Collinsia Verna. Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution 43(6): 1263-1272, 1989

Fitness consequences of mating system seed weight and emergence date in a winter annual collinsia verna. Evolution 43(6): 1263-1272, 1989

New proposals for the evaluation of the rate budburst of vines and modelling of the date of budburst. Journal International des Sciences de la Vigne et du Vin 26(2): 63-74, 125-126, 1992

Host plant species can influence the fitness of herbivore pathogens: The winter moth and its nucleopolyhedrovirus. Oecologia (Berlin) 131(4): 533-541, 2002

Host plant species can influence the fitness of herbivore pathogens: the winter moth and its nucleopolyhedrovirus. Oecologia 131(4): 533-541, 2002

Host Plant Species Can Influence the Fitness of Herbivore Pathogens: The Winter Moth and Its Nucleopolyhedrovirus. Oecologia 131(4): 533-541, 2002

Restricted male winter moth dispersal among host trees. Acta Oecologica 17(4): 319-329, 1996

Fitness Consequences of Host Use in the Field: Temporal Variation in Performance and a Life History Tradeoff in the Moth Rothschildia lebeau (Saturniidae). Oecologia 157(1): 69-82, 2008

Fitness consequences of host use in the field: temporal variation in performance and a life history tradeoff in the moth Rothschildia lebeau (Saturniidae). Oecologia 157(1): 69-82, 2008

Winter moth on Sitka spruce: synchrony of egg hatch and budburst, and its effect on larval survival. Ecological Entomology 16(3): 387-390, 1991