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The effect of the particle size of alumina sand on the combustion and emission behavior of cedar pellets in a fluidized bed combustor



The effect of the particle size of alumina sand on the combustion and emission behavior of cedar pellets in a fluidized bed combustor



Bioresource Technology 99(9): 3782-3786



A combustion experiment with cedar pellet fuel was carried out in a semi-pilot scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor. The effects of temperature, fluidized velocity, and bed material particle size on the emission of NOx, CO, and CO2 were investigated. The variations in the temperature profile and gas concentration in the vertical and horizontal directions of the combustor were also studied. The results showed that high temperature can improve the combustion efficiency and decrease CO emission. Moreover, increasing the fluidized velocity suppressed CO formation. In addition to temperature and fluidized velocity, the bed material also played an important role during cedar pellet combustion. Coarse bed materials were better than fine materials. In these test runs, the CO emission varied from 20 to 189 ppm, CO2 emission ranged from 5.7% to 19.5%, while NOx emission was quite stable at about 220 ppm.

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Accession: 033785767

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17869096

DOI: 10.1016/j.biortech.2007.07.010



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