+ Site Statistics
References:
52,654,530
Abstracts:
29,560,856
PMIDs:
28,072,755
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

The effects of protein sources supplemented with urea-treated potato pulp silage and feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate on feed intake, digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers



The effects of protein sources supplemented with urea-treated potato pulp silage and feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate on feed intake, digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers



Animal Science Journal: 4, 443-452



Six Japanese Black (Wagyu) steers (average initial weight 467 45 kg) fitted with a ruminal cannula were used in a split-plot design experiment comprising a 3 x 3 Latin square design (whole-plot) and a randomized block design (subplot). The whole-plot treatments were three different feeding levels of urea-treated potato pulp (PP) silage-based concentrate: 1.00%, 1.75% and 2.50% of body weight (BW) (on a dry matter (DM) basis). The subplot treatments consisted of the concentrate formulated to contain either soybean meal (SBM) as a rapidly rumen-degraded protein source or corn gluten meal (CGM) as a slowly degraded protein source. Dry matter intake tended to be lower (P = 0.071) for CGM (8.9 kg/day) than for SBM (9.4 kg/day). Protein sources had no significant effect on digestibility and in situ degradation. Ruminal ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) was lower (P = 0.033) for CGM (7.5 mg/dL) than for SBM (9.5 mg/dL). Protein sources did not affect ruminal pH and the total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentrations. The molar proportions of ruminal acetate and valerate were higher (P = 0.032) for CGM than for SBM. The maximum daily intake of the PP silage-based concentrate expressed as a percentage of BW was approximately 1.4% of BW. Dry matter intake was higher (P = 0.046) for steers fed at 1.0% of BW of the PP silage-based concentrate than for steers fed at 1.75% or 2.5% of BW of the concentrate. The feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate had no effect on DM and nutrients digestibility, except for crude protein (CP) digestibility CP digestibility tended to be lower (P = 0.071) for steers fed at 1.75% of BW of the PP silage-based concentrate than for steers fed at 1.0% or 2.5% of BW of the concentrate. The feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate also did not affect the in situ degradation parameter of hay and PP silage. The feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate did not affect ruminal pH, NH3-N and total VFA concentrations. The molar proportion of acetate was highest for steers fed at 1.0% of BW of the concentrate. In conclusion, in the urea-treated PP silage-based concentrate, CGM seems to be more effective than SBM for stabilizing the ruminal NH3-N concentration and to be advantageous for fiber digestion in the rumen. The feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate did not change the amount of VFA production in the rumen and the DM digestibility.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 033796998

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

The effects of protein sources supplemented with urea-treated potato pulp PP silage and feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate on feed intake, digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers. Animal Science Journal 79(4): 443-452, 2008

The effects of protein sources supplemented with urea-treated potato pulp (PP) silage and feeding levels of the PP silage-based concentrate on feed intake, digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers (vol 79, pg 443, 2008). Animal Science Journal 79(5): 644-644, 2008

The effects of urea-treated potato pulp (PP) ensiled with beet pulp or wheat bran pellets to reduce moisture of PP and flake density of corn grain supplemented with the PP silage on digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers. Animal Science Journal 81(3): 316-324, 2010

Effects of urea treatment of potato pulp and inclusion levels of potato pulp silage in supplements on digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers. Animal science journal 78(6): 587-595, 2007

The effects of inclusion levels of urea-treated potato pulp silage in concentrate and roughage sources on finishing performance and carcass quality in cull beef cows. Animal Science Journal 80(3): 280-285, 2010

Intake, digestibility, ruminal parameters, and microbial protein synthesis in crossbred steers fed diets based on Brachiaria grass silage and sorghum silage. Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinaria E Zootecnia 61(6): 1328-1338, 2009

Effects of Lactobacillus buchneri as a silage inoculant and as a probiotic on feed intake, apparent digestibility and ruminal fermentation and microbiology in wethers fed low-dry-matter whole-crop maize silage. Grass and Forage Science 73(1): 67-77, 2018

The effects of potato pulp and feeding level of supplements on digestibility, in situ forage degradation and ruminal fermentation in beef steers. Animal Science Journal 77(6): 587-594, 2006

Digestibility of common reed (Pharagmites communis Trin.) silage as ruminant feed and effects of inclusion levels in the diet of breeding cows on feed intake, ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites. Animal Science Journal 88(12): 1955-1962, 2017

Effects of corn silage hybrids and dietary nonforage fiber sources on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and productive performance of lactating Holstein dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science 93(11): 5397-5407, 2011

Effects of substituting amaranth silage for corn silage on intake, growth performance, diet digestibility, microbial protein, nitrogen retention and ruminal fermentation in fattening lambs. Animal Feed Science and Technology 192: 29-38, 2014

Digestibility and ruminal fermentation in beef steers fed hay or silage with or without nitrogen supplement. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 71(4): 1292, 1991

Effects of silage crop and dietary crude protein levels on digestibility, ruminal fermentation, nitrogen use efficiency, and performance of finishing beef cattle. Animal Feed Science and Technology 220: 22-33, 2016

Chemical composition, silage fermentation characteristics, and in vitro ruminal fermentation parameters of potato-wheat straw silage treated with molasses and lactic acid bacteria and corn silage. Journal of Animal Science 93(9): 4377-4386, 2016

The utilization of maize silage for intensive beef production. 2. The effect of urea on silage fermentation and on the voluntary intake and performance of young cattle fed maize silage-based diets. Journal of Agricultural Science, UK 84(2): 365-372, 1975