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Urography into the 21st century: new contrast media, renal handling, imaging characteristics, and nephrotoxicity



Urography into the 21st century: new contrast media, renal handling, imaging characteristics, and nephrotoxicity



Radiology 204(2): 297-312



A 37-year-old woman underwent an emergency operation at our hospital because of severe abdominal pain and ileus. Most of her small intestine and ascending colon were observed to have become necrotic due to occlusion of her superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Pathological findings of the resected intestine revealed that her SMA was completely thrombosed 2 cm distal from its origin with smooth muscle proliferation. Post-surgical blood analysis of her pre-operative serum was positive for lupus anticoagulant and antinuclear antibodies. She noticed vaginal bleeding due to missed abortion on the 31st day after the operation. We diagnosed her acute abdominal pain to be that of antiphospholipid syndrome associated with her pregnancy.

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Accession: 034144057

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9240511

DOI: 10.1148/radiology.204.2.9240511


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