+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia: comparison of clinical features and outcome between Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis



Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia: comparison of clinical features and outcome between Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis



Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection 41(2): 124-129



Background and Purpose: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens. This study was conducted to clarify the clinical features and outcome of patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia.Methods: Patients with vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia treated at a medical center in northern Taiwan between November 1998 and July 2006 were reviewed. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were compared.Results: Twelve patients (6 males and 6 females) were included for analyses. The mean age was 69.3 years (range, 40 to 86 years), and 8 cases (66.7%) were older than 65 years. All patients had underlying disease. Two patients received total hip replacement before development of VRE bacteremia. Twelve patients had prior exposure to broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Ten patients had prior intensive care unit stay and prior mechanical ventilation before VRE bacteremia. All of the patients (n = 12) had an intravascular catheter in place. Bacteremia was caused by E faecalis in 4 patients and by E faecium in eight. The portals of entry included urinary tract (8.3%), skin, soft tissue and bone (41.7%) and unknown sources (50.0%). E faecium showed a higher rate of resistance to ampicillin and teicoplanin than E faecalis (87.5% vs 0.0%, p=0.01). The 60-day mortality rate was higher in patients with E. faecium bacteremia than E faecalis bacteremia (62.5% vs 0.0%), although statistical significance was not obtained (p=0.08).Conclusions: VRE bacteremia may have an impact on the mortality and morbidity of hospitalized patients. Patients with bacteremia caused by vancomycin-resistant E faecium had a grave prognosis, especially immuno-suppressed patients. The prudent use of antibiotics and strict enforcement of infection control may prevent further emergence and spread of VRE.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 034180520

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 18473099


Related references

Bacteremia with vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium and vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus faecium Comparison of epidemiology and clinical outcome. Program & Abstracts of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy 33(0): 275, 1993

Comparison of the clinical characteristics and outcomes associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium bacteremia. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 56(5): 2452-2458, 2012

Outcomes for and risk factors associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium bacteremia in cancer patients. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 28(9): 1054-1059, 2007

Risk factors and outcomes associated with non-Enterococcus faecalis, non-Enterococcus faecium enterococcal bacteremia. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 27(1): 28-33, 2006

New combinations of mutations in VanD-Type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus avium strains. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 53(5): 1952-1963, 2009

Prevalence, outcome and risk factor associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India. Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology 34(1): 38-45, 2016

Multicenter clinical evaluation of VRESelect agar for identification of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 51(8): 2758-2760, 2014

Structure of an antigenic teichoic acid shared by clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Carbohydrate Research 316(1-4): 155-160, March 31, 1999

Molecular Epidemiology of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Clinical Specimens in the Northwest of Iran. Microbial Drug Resistance 24(8): 1165-1173, 2018

Clinical management of non-faecium non-faecalis vancomycin-resistant enterococci infection. Focus on Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus/flavescens. Journal of Infection and ChemoTherapy 24(4): 237-246, 2018

Molecular characterization of clinical and environmental isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis from a teaching hospital in Wales. Journal of Medical Microbiology 52(Pt 9): 821-827, 2003

Isolation and chemical characterization of a capsular polysaccharide antigen shared by clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Infection and Immunity 67(3): 1213-1219, 1999

Survey of Virulence Determinants among Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Clinical Specimens of Hospitalized Patients of North west of Iran. Open Microbiology Journal 6: 34-39, 2012

Comparative evaluation of penicillin, ampicillin, and imipenem MICs and susceptibility breakpoints for vancomycin-susceptible and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 39(7): 2729-2731, 2001

Novel chromogenic medium for detection of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 46(7): 2442-2444, 2008