+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Hypergravity Effects on Prenatal Development Potential Relations to Fetal Programming



Hypergravity Effects on Prenatal Development Potential Relations to Fetal Programming



FASEB Journal 18(4-5): Abst 478 16



The term &39;fetal programming&39; refers to the concept that intrauterine events set the stage for disease states in adulthood. It has become recognized that low birth weight is a major determinant of cardiovascular dysfunction and diabetes. We analyzed the effects of continuous 2.0-g hypergravity on average litter fetal body mass (FBM), crown-rump length (CRL), ear-to-ear length (E-E) and placental mass (PM) in gestation day (G) and 22 fetuses, as well as birth and 6-hours postpartum average litter neonate body mass (NBM), crown-rump length (CRL) and ear-to-ear length (E-E). Beginning on Gestational day (G)11 of the rats&39; 22 day pregnancy, rat dams and their litters were continuously exposed to 2.0-g via centrifugation. At G20 and G22, FBM, CRL/FBM, E-E/FBM and PM/FBM were significantly reduced (p< 0.05) in HG. In addition, birth and suckling neonates exposed to HG showed a significant reduction (p>0.05) in NBM, CRL/NBM and E-E/NBM. The reduction in placental mass in the fetuses suggests that there may be a reduction in blood flow from the dam to the fetus. Growth data suggest an intrauterine oxygen and/or nutritional deficiency in both fetuses and neonates. Together, our data suggest that intrauterine events occurring during centrifugation are probably associated with prenatal hypergravity exposure. Additional studies are focussed on long-term effects of prenatal hypergravity exposure and relations to adult disease. NASA Grant NCC2-1373, NIMH Grant MH46485.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 035060447

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Comparative analysis of hypo - and hypergravity effects on prenatal development of mammals. Physiologist 28(6 Suppl): S5-S8, 1985

Effects of hypergravity on the prenatal development of peripheral vestibulocerebellar afferent fibers. Advances in Space Research 38(6): 1041-1051, 2006

A supply-demand model of prenatal cholesterol programming Assessing the importance of fetal growth potential. FASEB Journal 16(4): A616, 2002

Prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal programming: effects on neuroendocrine and immune function. Experimental Biology and Medicine 230(6): 376-388, 2005

Fetal programming Differential effects of prenatal exposure to bisphenol-A and methoxychlor on postnatal reproductive function. Biology of Reproduction 68(Suppl. 1): 273-274, 2003

In utero development of fetal thirst and appetite: potential for programming. Journal of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation 11(3): 123-130, 2004

Investigations of fetal development models for prenatal drug exposure and schizophrenia. Prenatal d-amphetamine effects upon early and late juvenile behavior in the rat. Psychopharmacology 116(2): 226-236, 1994

Fetal programming for athletic performance in the horse: potential effects of IUGR. Equine Veterinary Education 15(S6): 24-37, 2003

Fetal programming for athletic performance in the horse: potential effects of IUGR. Equine Veterinary Education 14(2): 98-112, 2002

LIM kinase function and renal growth: Potential role for LIM kinases in fetal programming of kidney development. Life Sciences 186: 17-24, 2017

Adverse effects of nutritional programming during prenatal and early postnatal life, some aspects of regulation and potential prevention and treatments. Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 60(Suppl. 3): 17-35, 2009

Fetal programming Prenatal exposure to testosterone leads to fetal growth retardation and postnatal catch-up growth in sheep. Biology of Reproduction 68(Suppl. 1): 127, 2003

Fetal programming: prenatal testosterone excess leads to fetal growth retardation and postnatal catch-up growth in sheep. Endocrinology 145(2): 790-798, 2004

Prenatal programming of reproductive neuroendocrine function: the effect of prenatal androgens on the development of estrogen positive feedback and ovarian cycles in the ewe. Biology of Reproduction 72(3): 619-627, 2005

Fetal Programming: Prenatal Origins of Health and Illness. Current Directions in Psychological Science 17(1): 36-41, 2008