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Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a potential new risk factor for coronary artery disease and a therapeutic target



Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a potential new risk factor for coronary artery disease and a therapeutic target



Current Opinion in Pharmacology 1(2): 121-125



The recognition that atherosclerosis represents an inflammatory disease has begun to shift interest towards novel therapies that could specifically target the underlying inflammatory component of atherogenesis. Like low-density lipoprotein, an ideal new drug target would be a modifiable plasma risk factor that not only reflects the ongoing inflammatory process but also actively promotes it. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, also known as platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is a new risk factor that may have the potential to fulfil these requirements.

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Accession: 035226814

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11714085

DOI: 10.1016/s1471-4892(01)00024-8


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