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Trends and prevalence of dietary supplement use in 2-9 year old US children using CSFII



Trends and prevalence of dietary supplement use in 2-9 year old US children using CSFII



FASEB Journal 15(5): A984, March 8



The Dietary Guidelines 2000 suggest that healthy Americans should not depend on supplements to meet their nutrient needs. Yet, it has been reported that an increasing number of U.S. adults and children consume vitamin and mineral supplements. We used data from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) 1994-96 and 1998 to describe the prevalence and trends in the use of supplements in U.S. children 2 to 9 years old and to investigate the impact on diet quality. Data were analyzed using SPSS and SAS and appropriate sampling weights were incorporated. Preliminary results showed that between 1994-96 and 1998 there was a statistically insignificant 2.4 percentage point increase in children using vitamin supplements every day and a 3.2 percentage point decrease in those not taking any supplement at all. During the same period, there was a 1.6 percentage point increase in the number of children who took multivitamins with iron or other minerals. A 10 percentage point decrease was observed in vitamin C supplement users between 1994-96 and 1998. Approximately 40.5% and 38% of 2-3 and 4-6 year olds, respectively, used supplements daily compared to 25% of 7-9 year olds (P<0.0001). Children who took supplements routinely had significantly (P <0.0001) higher caloric, protein, total fat, carbohydrate, fiber and micronutrient intakes than those that did not consume any supplement at all. The data suggest further research is needed to examine the multiple factors related to dietary quality and vitamin supplement use in children.

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