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Benefit of intensive statin therapy in women: results from PROVE IT-TIMI 22



Benefit of intensive statin therapy in women: results from PROVE IT-TIMI 22



Circulation. Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes 4(3): 328-336



Despite the known benefit of intensive statin therapy for reducing future cardiovascular events, its effectiveness in women has been questioned by some. In the Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 22 (PROVE IT-TIMI 22) trial, 911 (21.9%) women and 3251 (78.1%) men were randomized to intensive statin (atorvastatin 80 mg) versus standard therapy (pravastatin 40 mg) therapy for a median duration of 2.1 years. The primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina; revascularization (occurring after 30 days); or stroke. Safety end points included elevations in liver function tests, creatine kinase, and myalgias/myositis. Women had a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) of 42.8% from baseline at 30 days (to a median of 60 mg/dL) in the intensive therapy arm, with 88.8% reaching the LDL goal of <100 mg/dL and 65.0% of <70 mg/dL, compared with a 16.8% reduction in LDL (to a median of 88 mg/dL) in the standard therapy arm. Women receiving intensive statin therapy had a significant 25% relative reduction over standard dose (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.99; P=0.04) for the primary composite end point compared with a 14% reduction for men (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.99; P=0.04; P-interaction, 0.38). No differences were observed between sexes for safety (all P-interaction ≥0.11). This trial provides evidence that both women and men derived benefit from intensive statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome, and thus, sex should not be a factor in determining who should be treated with intensive statin therapy.

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Accession: 036095166

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 21487089

DOI: 10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.110.957720


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