+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Mating, ovariole number and sperm production of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti L in Australia broad thermal optima provide the capacity for survival in a changing climate



Mating, ovariole number and sperm production of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti L in Australia broad thermal optima provide the capacity for survival in a changing climate



Physiological Entomology aop(aop): 0-0



Little is known about mating, ovariole number and sperm production of Aedes aegypti (L.) in Australia, especially in relation to climate. To determine the extent of interpopulation variation and thermal dependence of reproductive traits in A. aegypti, laboratory studies are conducted using colonies originating from up to four locations in Queensland, Australia. Observations of insemination reveal that these behaviours are temperature-dependent, although humidity levels appear to have little effect, with only small increases in insemination at higher humidities. No noteworthy variations in thermal optima (temperature ranges within which maximal performance occurs) for such behaviours are observed between colonies, with all showing high levels of insemination between 25 and 35 C. Both male and female maximum fecundity for A. aegypti are also found to be temperature-dependent. Sperm counts, not hitherto obtained for Australian A. aegypti, range from approximately 3 5 per male, with counts increasing with increased rearing and holding temperature, despite a decreasing body size. Conversely, ovary size decreases with temperature and body size, from approximately 1 ovarioles per female at 17 C, to 85 at 35 C. The lack of variation in reproductive capacity between colonies of different geographical origin indicates that any locally-acting selective pressures are not driving divergence in key reproductive traits such as insemination ability and fecundity. This may be because the source populations used are not from sufficiently diverse climates. Nonetheless, the broad thermal optima for reproductive traits in A. aegypti are suggestive of limitations on these traits not being responsible for limiting distribution and population growth in the event of projected mean temperature rises.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 036307227

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3032.2011.00818.x


Related references

Productivity and population density estimates of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) in Australia. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 27(3): 313-322, 2013

Factors associated with male mating success of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 80(3): 395-400, 2009

Larval competition between the introduced vector of dengue fever in australia aedes aegypti and a native container breeding mosquito aedes notoscriptus diptera culicidae. Australian Journal of Zoology 34(4): 527-534, 1986

Larval competition between the introduced vector of dengue fever in Australia, Aedes aegypti (L.), and a native container-breeding mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae). Australian Journal of Zoology 344: 527-534, 1986

Larval competition between the introduced vector and dengue fever in Australia, Aedes aegypti (L.), and a native container-breeding mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus (Skuse) (Diptera Culicidae). Australian journal of zoology4(4): 527-534, 1986

Co-occurrence patterns of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and Aedes mediovitattus, a dengue competent mosquito in Puerto Rico. Ecohealth 8(3): 365-375, 2011

Male contributions during mating increase female survival in the disease vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Journal of Insect Physiology 108: 1-9, 2018

Age and body size influence male sperm capacity of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 44(3): 422-426, 2007

Age and Body Size Influence Male Sperm Capacity of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 44(3): 422-426, 2007

Effects of temperature and larval diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland, Australia. Medical and veterinary entomology 14(1): 31-37, 2000

Rapid evolution of reduced receptivity to interspecific mating in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in response to satyrization by invasive Aedes albopictus. Evolutionary Ecology 28(1): 193-203, 2014

Possible jungle dengue recent studies and hypotheses distribution human primary host mosquito vector virus aedes aegypti monkey aedes albopictus. Japanese Journal of Medical Science & Biology 20(SUPP): 69-74, 1967

Laboratory studies on the interaction between dengue virus and the aedes aegypti mosquito vector. Annual Progress Report of the S E A T O (South East Asia Treaty Organization) Medical Research Laboratories : 1971, 1970

The dengue virus mosquito vector Aedes aegypti at high elevation in Mexico. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 87(5): 902-909, 2012

AeGEPUCI: a database of gene expression in the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Bmc Research Notes 3: 248, 2010