Reciprocal fluxes of stream and riparian invertebrates in a coastal California basin with Mediterranean climate

Rundio, D.E.; Lindley, S.T.

Ecological Research 27(3): 539-550

2012


ISSN/ISBN: 0912-3814
DOI: 10.1007/s11284-011-0920-6
Accession: 036319055

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Abstract
Stream and riparian food webs are connected by reciprocal fluxes of invertebrates, and a growing number of studies demonstrate strong effects of these subsidies on consumers and food webs in both habitats. However, despite its importance in understanding energy flow between these habitats, seasonality of reciprocal subsidies has been examined only in a single temperate system in Japan. We measured input of terrestrial invertebrates and emergence of adult aquatic insects for 14 months in two adjacent streams in a coastal Mediterranean basin in California to assess seasonal patterns, annual fluxes, and local variation. Fluxes of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates fluctuated seasonally and were relatively synchronous, although in the fall of 24, terrestrial inputs peaked 1 2 months earlier than emergence. Terrestrial inputs were similar in the two streams with annual flux of 7.9 8.6 g dry mass m?2 year?1. Emergence differed between the streams: annual emergence was 7.8 g m?2 year?1 (similar to terrestrial flux) in one reach but 5.3 g m?2 year?1 from the other. The presence of streambed travertine in the reach with lower emergence was the primary difference in habitat between the streams, suggesting that travertine may reduce emergence and alter net reciprocal flux. Comparison of our results with those from Japan suggests that seasonality and net annual flux of reciprocal stream-riparian subsidies vary among biomes due to differences in climate, vegetation, and geography. Our results also indicate that local factors, such as travertine, may cause reciprocal fluxes to vary at finer spatial scales.

Reciprocal fluxes of stream and riparian invertebrates in a coastal California basin with Mediterranean climate