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Efficiency of different formulations of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and effect of co-inoculation of Bacillus subtilis with two different strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum



Efficiency of different formulations of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and effect of co-inoculation of Bacillus subtilis with two different strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum



World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 28(7): 2541-2550



A key constraint in successfully obtaining an effective inoculant is overcoming difficulties in formulating a viable and user-friendly final product and maintaining the microbial cells in a competent state. Co-cultures of rhizobia and PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) are a logical next subject for formulation researchers as they can influence the efficacy of rhizobia. A greenhouse experiment was set to assess the formulation effect of one strain i.e. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, 532c (granules, liquid and broth) and also to determine the efficiency of co-inoculation of Bacillus with two commercial strains of B. japonicum (532c and RCR 3407) on 2 soybean (Glycine max L.) varieties. PCR-RFLP analysis was used to determine the nodule occupancy in each treatment. Most of the inoculants showed increased nodulation and biomass yields (by approximately 2-5 and 4-10 g plant(-1) respectively) as compared to the uninoculated controls. TGx1740-2F showed no significant differences in nodule fresh weights for the formulation effect while the co-inoculants increased the nodule fresh weights by up to 4 g plant(-1). The liquid and granule-based inoculants induced higher biomass yields (4-8 g plant(-1)) suggesting a possible impact of formulation on the effectiveness of the inoculants. The co-inoculants also gave higher yields but showing no significant differences to the rhizobial inoculants. Nodule occupancy was 100 % for the rhizobial inoculants as well as the co-inoculants emphasizing the infectivity and high competitiveness of 532c and RCR 3407 strains despite the high population of indigenous rhizobia.

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Accession: 036400145

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PMID: 22806160

DOI: 10.1007/s11274-012-1062-x


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