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First- and third-person perspectives in psychotic disorders and mood disorders with psychotic features



First- and third-person perspectives in psychotic disorders and mood disorders with psychotic features



Schizophrenia Research and Treatment 2011: 769136



Lack of insight, very frequent in schizophrenia, can be considered a deficit in Theory of Mind (ToM) performances, and is also found in other psychiatric disorders. In this study, we used the first- to third-person shift to examine subjects with psychotic and psychotic mood disorders. 92 patients were evaluated with SANS and SAPS scales and asked to talk about their delusions. They were asked to state whether they thought what they said was believable for them and for the interviewer. Two weeks later, 79 patients listened to a tape where their delusion was reenacted by two actors and were asked the same two questions. Some patients gained insight when using third-person perspective. These patients had lower SAPS scores, a lower score on SAPS item on delusions, and significant improvement in their SAPS delusion score at the second interview. Better insight was not related to a specific diagnostic group.

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Accession: 036524119

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 22937273

DOI: 10.1155/2011/769136


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