+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya



Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya



Malaria Journal 11: 263



Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65%) were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could not is still too high. Furthermore, knowing the MOH recommended anti-malarial medication does not always ensure it is recommended or dispensed to customers. Retailer training and education are both areas that could be improved. Considering the influence that patient demand has on retailer behaviour, future interventions focusing on community education may positively influence appropriate dispensing of anti-malarials.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 036529600

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 22866866

DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-11-263


Related references

Geographically-weighted regression of knowledge and behaviour determinants to anti-malarial recommending and dispensing practice among medicine retailers in western Kenya: capacitating targeted interventions. Malaria Journal 15(1): 562, 2016

A cross-sectional study of the availability and price of anti-malarial medicines and malaria rapid diagnostic tests in private sector retail drug outlets in rural Western Kenya, 2013. Malaria Journal 15(1): 359, 2016

Knowledge and behaviour as determinants of anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western Kenya. Malaria Journal 10: 99, 2011

Drug repositioning as a route to anti-malarial drug discovery: preliminary investigation of the in vitro anti-malarial efficacy of emetine dihydrochloride hydrate. Malaria Journal 12: 359, 2013

Modulating effects of plasma containing anti-malarial antibodies on in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum. Malaria Journal 9: 326, 2010

Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western Kenya. Malaria Journal 9: 295, 2010

Assessment of molecular markers for anti-malarial drug resistance after the introduction and scale-up of malaria control interventions in western Kenya. Malaria Journal 14: 75, 2015

Impact of ministry of health interventions on private medicine retailer knowledge and practices on anti-malarial treatment in Kenya. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 80(6): 905-913, 2009

Anti-malarial drug use among preschool children in an area of seasonal malaria transmission in Kenya. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 61(5): 770-775, 1999

Community perceptions of targeted anti-malarial mass drug administrations in two provinces in Vietnam: a quantitative survey. Malaria Journal 16(1): 17, 2017

The x ray crystal structure of the anti malarial and anti leprotic drug 4 4 di aminodiphenyl sulfone. Chemical Communications (Journal of the Chemical Society Section D) 15: 920-921, 1970

Repurposing the anti-malarial drug, quinacrine: new anti-colitis properties. Oncotarget 7(33): 52928-52939, 2016

One friend among foes; anti-malarial drug aretesunate as a novel addition to anti-psoriasis weaponry. European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences 18(17): 2401-2402, 2014

Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal. Malaria Journal 11: 402, 2012

The anti-malarial artesunate acts also as a potent anti-cancer drug via both p53-dependent and -independent pathways. Archives of Dermatological Research 293(1-2): 66, 2001