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Newborn screening of congenital cytomegalovirus infection using saliva can be influenced by breast feeding



Newborn screening of congenital cytomegalovirus infection using saliva can be influenced by breast feeding



Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition 98(2): F182



Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection occurs in 0.2–2% of all births in developed countries and causes developmental abnormalities.1 In addition to patients symptomatic at birth, asymptomatic newborns can develop late-onset sequelae, including sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay. As the early identification of congenitally infected newborns may allow early intervention and antiviral treatment options, it is important to establish newborn cCMV screening programmes.Since newborn screening assays using dried blood spots for cCMV infection were shown to have a limitation in their sensitivity, Boppana et al2 reported an alternative assay using saliva specimen last year. Even with a consideration of CMV secretions into the breast milk of carrier mothers, the overall frequency of false-positive results for their saliva-based PCR assay was reported to be less than 0.03%. However, there remains a concern that carry-over from breast milk may generate false-positive results as CMV appears in breast milk within.

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Accession: 036533917

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 22874907

DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-302230


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