EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The nutritional status of children in Bhutan results from the 28 National Nutrition Survey and trends over time



The nutritional status of children in Bhutan results from the 28 National Nutrition Survey and trends over time







There are few reports on the nutritional status of Bhutanese children. The objective of this paper is to summarize results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and to describe progress achieved during the last two decades. A cross-sectional survey of 2376 children aged 6 to 59 months was conducted during November-December 2008 to provide national and regional estimates. A multi-stage cluster sampling method was applied and 40 gewogs/thromdes were selected from each region (Western, Central, Eastern). Guidelines on how to measure length/height and weight followed WHO standardized procedures. Data were analysed for consistency and validation using the software WHO Anthro and the WHO SPSS macro. Underweight, stunting, overweight, wasting and thinness were defined based on the WHO Child Growth Standards. Data from 1986-88 and 1999 national surveys were reanalysed using the WHO standards to describe trends in nutritional status. Nationally, 34.9% Bhutanese preschool children are stunted and 10.4% are underweight. Wasting is 4.7%, with severe wasting close to 2% in rural areas, while overweight affects 4.4% of preschool children. While underweight rates are similar across regions, wasting is substantially more prevalent in the Western region and stunting in the Eastern region. Stunting shows a steep rise during the first two years of life, as high as 40%, and levels off thereafter, while wasting is greatest among children aged 6-24 months and subsequently decreases. The prevalence of stunting fell from 60.9% in 1986-88 to 34.9% in 2008, and underweight declined from 34.0% to 10.4% during same period. The percentage of wasted children dropped from 5.2% in 1986-88 to 2.5% in 1999 but then increased to 4.7% in 2008. There have been major improvements in the nutritional status of Bhutanese children over the past two decades, however, linear growth retardation remains a significant concern. Early identification of growth faltering is essential for improving the effectiveness of public health programs to prevent stunting. Similarly, wasting rates indicate the need for a system to identify children with severe malnutrition in the isolated communities so that they can receive appropriate care.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 036585749

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

The nutritional status of children in Bhutan: results from the 2008 National Nutrition Survey and trends over time. Bmc Pediatrics 12(): 151-151, 2013

Trends in nutrient intakes, nutritional status, and correlates of undernutrition among rural children below 5 years of age: The National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau Survey 2012. Journal of Postgraduate Medicine 63(2): 84-91, 2017

Nutritional status of young children--the 1982/83 National Nutrition Survey. Papua and New Guinea Medical Journal 31(2): 91-101, 1988

Nutrition status in Argentinean children 6 to 72 months old: results from the National Nutrition and Health Survey (ENNyS). Archivos Argentinos de Pediatria 107(5): 397-404, 2010

Trends in the nutritional status of women and children in India update from the National Family Health Survey-3. Sight And Life Magazine: , 15-21, 2008

Salad and raw vegetable consumption and nutritional status in the adult US population: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 106(9): 1394-1404, 2006

Dietary intake and nutritional status of US adult marijuana users: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Public Health Nutrition 4(3): 781-786, 2001

Nutritional causes of anemia in Mexican children under 5 years. Results from the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey. Salud Publica de Mexico 54(2): 108-115, 2012

Nutritional status of pre-school children and women in Mexico: results of a probabilistic national survey. Gaceta Medica de Mexico 126(3): 207-24; Discussion 224-6, 1990

Nutritional status of indigenous children younger than five years of age in Mexico: results of a national probabilistic survey. Salud Publica de Mexico 45 Suppl 4(): S466-S476, 2004

Rice Consumption and Selected Indicators of Dietary and Nutritional Status Among Children and Adolescents Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20072008. Nutrition Today 50(3): 142-148, 2015

Time Trends and Predictors of Acute Gastroenteritis in the United States: Results From National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2014. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 51(8): 693-700, 2017

Nutritional status of indigenous children: findings from the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition in Brazil. International Journal for Equity in Health 12: 23-23, 2015

Self-reported lifetime asthma and nativity status in U.S. children and adolescents: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 21(2 Suppl): 125-139, 2010

National trends in long-term use of antidepressant medications: results from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 75(2): 169-177, 2014