EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The performance of single- and multi-proxy transfer functions testate amoebae, bryophytes, vascular plants for reconstructing mire surface wetness and pH


Quaternary Research 79(1): 6-13
The performance of single- and multi-proxy transfer functions testate amoebae, bryophytes, vascular plants for reconstructing mire surface wetness and pH
Peatlands are widely exploited archives of paleoenvironmental change. We developed and compared multiple transfer functions to infer peatland depth to the water table (DWT) and pH based on testate amoeba (percentages, or presence/absence), bryophyte presence/absence, and vascular plant presence/absence data from sub-alpine peatlands in the SE Swiss Alps in order to 1) compare the performance of single-proxy vs. multi-proxy models and 2) assess the performance of presence/absence models. Bootstrapping cross-validation showing the best performing single-proxy transfer functions for both DWT and pH were those based on bryophytes. The best performing transfer functions overall for DWT were those based on combined testate amoebae percentages, bryophytes and vascular plants; and, for pH, those based on testate amoebae and bryophytes. The comparison of DWT and pH inferred from testate amoeba percentages and presence/absence data showed similar general patterns but differences in the magnitude and timing of some shifts. These results show new directions for paleoenvironmental research, 1) suggesting that it is possible to build good-performing transfer functions using presence/absence data, although with some loss of accuracy, and 2) supporting the idea that multi-proxy inference models may improve paleoecological reconstruction. The performance of multi-proxy and single-proxy transfer functions should be further compared in paleoecological data.


Accession: 036615478

DOI: 10.1016/j.yqres.2012.08.004



Related references

Reconstructing peatland water tables using transfer functions for plant macrofossils and testate amoebae A methodological comparison. Quaternary International 268 (Aug 3): 34-43, 2012

Reconstructing peatland water tables using transfer functions for plant macrofossils and testate amoebae a methodological comparison. Quaternary International 268(none): 0, 2012

Reconstructing Holocene water tables in New Zealand using testate amoebae: differential preservation of tests and implications for the use of transfer functions. Holocene 13(1): 61-72, 2003

Contrasting species-environment relationships in communities of testate amoebae, bryophytes and vascular plants along the fen-bog gradient. Microbial Ecology 59(3): 499-510, 2010

Abrupt ecological changes in the last 800 years inferred from a mountainous bog using testate amoebae traits and multi-proxy data. European Journal of Protistology 55(Pt B): 165-180, 2016

A multiproxy approach to reconstructing surface wetness changes and prehistoric bog bursts in a raised mire system at Derryville Bog, Co. Tipperary, Ireland. Holocene 15(4): 585-601, 2005

A rapid response of testate amoebae and vegetation to inundation of a kettle hole mire. Journal of Paleolimnology 43.3, 2010

Testate amoebae (Protozoa) as indicators of drainage in a forested mire, northern Ontario, Canada. Archiv fuer Protistenkunde, 1413: 179-183, 1992

Reconstructing hydrological variability from testate amoebae analysis in Carpathian peatlands. Journal of Paleolimnology y; 36(1): 1-17, 2006

A temperature and mire hydrology record for the last 500 years based on pollen, Testate amoebae and pine needle production. Congres Geologique International, Resumes 33, 2008