+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Impact of spatial heterogeneity of plant species on herbage productivity, herbage quality and ewe and lamb performance of continuously stocked, perennial ryegrass–white clover swards



Impact of spatial heterogeneity of plant species on herbage productivity, herbage quality and ewe and lamb performance of continuously stocked, perennial ryegrass–white clover swards



Grass and Forage Science 68(4): 537-547



The benefits of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) in pastures are widely recognized. However, white clover is perceived as being unreliable due to its typically low content and spatial and temporal variability in mixed (grass-legume) pastures. One solution to increase the clover proportion and quality of herbage available to grazing animals may be to spatially separate clover from grass within the same field. In a field experiment, perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and white clover were sown as a mixture and compared with alternating strips of ryegrass and clover (at 1 5 and 3 m widths), or in adjacent monocultures (strips of 18 m width within a 36-m-wide field). Pastures were stocked by ewes and lambs for three 10-month grazing periods. Over the 3 years of the experiment, spatial separation of grass and clover, compared with a grass clover mixture, increased clover herbage production, although its proportion in the sward declined through time (0 49 0 54 vs 0 34 in the mixture in the first year, 0 28 0 33 vs 0 15 in the second year and 0 03 0 18 vs 0 01 in the third year). Total herbage production in the growing season in the spatially separated treatments decreased from 11384 kg DM ha?1 in the first year to 8150 kg DM ha?1 in the third year. Crude protein concentration of clover and grass components in the 18-m adjacent monoculture treatment was greater than the mixture treatment for both clover (310 vs 280 g kg?1 DM) and grass (200 vs 180 g kg?1 DM). There was no clear benefit in liveweight gain beyond the first year in response to spatially separating grass and clover into monocultures within the same field.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 036679468

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/gfs.12027


Related references

Herbage intake and milk yield of dairy cows grazing perennial ryegrass swards or white clover/perennial ryegrass swards at low- and medium-herbage allowances. Animal Feed Science and Technology 119(1/2): 13-27, 2005

Effect of ploidy of perennial ryegrass on the herbage productivity and growth of white clover in ryegrass/clover swards. Recent advances in grassland production and management: 79-84, 1992

The effect of herbage allowance on herbage intake and performance of lambs grazing perennial ryegrass and red clover swards. Journal of Agricultural Science, UK 86(2): 355-365, 1976

The effect of fertilizer nitrogen rate white clover variety and closeness of cutting on herbage productivity from perennial ryegrass white clover swards. Grass & Forage Science 42(1): 85-96, 1987

The impact of grazing severity on perennial ryegrass white clover swards stocked continuously with beef cattle. Grass & Forage Science 44(3): 315-328, 1989

Effect of herbage rejection by steers on white clover (Trifolium repens) branching and development in continuously stocked grass-clover swards. Journal of Agricultural Science 124(2): 205-212, 1995

Studies on the cutting management of grass-clover swards. 5. The effect of changes in the closeness of cutting at different times in the season on the yield and quality of herbage from a perennial ryegrass-white clover sward. J. agric. Sci., Camb, 68: Pt 2, 249-54. Bibl. 5, 1967

The effects of clover variety, cutting interval and nitrogen application on herbage yields, proportions and heights in perennial ryegrass-white clover swards. Grass and forage science 37(1): 1-13, 1982

A note on herbage intake by Greyface ewes on perennial ryegrass/white clover swards in the autumn. Animal Production 53(2): 257-260, 1991

Ewe and lamb performance on perennial ryegrass and perennial ryegrass plus white clover swards under controlled sward heights. Animal Production 48(3): 648, 1989

Herbage intake and milk yield of dairy cows grazing perennial ryegrass swards or white clover. Animal feed science and technology7 119(1-2): 13-27, 2005

Estimating errors in calculating herbage growth from net herbage accumulation rates in continuously stocked swards. 'TMannetje, L, Frame, J Grassland and society 181-184, 1994

Productivity and persistence of white clover grown with three perennial ryegrass varieties and continuously stocked with sheep. Soil grassland animal relationships Proceedings of 13th general meeting of the European Grassland Federation, Banska Bystrica, Czechoslovakia, June 25-29, 1990, Volume 2: 157-162, 1990

The effects of a wide range of nitrogen rates on some chemical constituents of the herbage from perennial ryegrass swards with and without white clover. Journal of Agricultural Science, UK 83(3): 393-401, 1974

Comparison of annual herbage yield, botanical composition and mineral content of swards of perennial ryegrass sown with white and red clover. Irish Journal of Agricultural & Food Research 37(2): 159-172, 1998