+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Comparison of outcomes in neck pain patients with and without dizziness undergoing chiropractic treatment: a prospective cohort study with 6 month follow-up



Comparison of outcomes in neck pain patients with and without dizziness undergoing chiropractic treatment: a prospective cohort study with 6 month follow-up



Chiropractic and Manual Therapies 21(1): 3



The symptom 'dizziness' is common in patients with chronic whiplash related disorders. However, little is known about dizziness in neck pain patients who have not suffered whiplash. Therefore, the purposes of this study are to compare baseline factors and clinical outcomes of neck pain patients with and without dizziness undergoing chiropractic treatment and to compare outcomes based on gender. This prospective cohort study compares adult neck pain patients with dizziness (n = 177) to neck pain patients without dizziness (n = 228) who presented for chiropractic treatment, (no chiropractic or manual therapy in the previous 3 months). Patients completed the numerical pain rating scale (NRS) and Bournemouth questionnaire (BQN) at baseline. At 1, 3 and 6 months after start of treatment the NRS and BQN were completed along with the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scale. Demographic information was also collected. Improvement at each follow-up data collection point was categorized using the PGIC as 'improved' or 'not improved'. Differences between the two groups for NRS and BQN subscale and total scores were calculated using the unpaired Student's t-test. Gender differences between the patients with dizziness were also calculated using the unpaired t-test. Females accounted for 75% of patients with dizziness. The majority of patients with and without dizziness reported clinically relevant improvement at 1, 3 and 6 months with 80% of patients with dizziness and 78% of patients without dizziness being improved at 6 months. Patients with dizziness reported significantly higher baseline NRS and BQN scores, but at 6 months there were no significant differences between patients with and without dizziness for any of the outcome measures. Females with dizziness reported higher levels of depression compared to males at 1, 3 and 6 months (p = 0.007, 0.005, 0.022). Neck pain patients with dizziness reported significantly higher pain and disability scores at baseline compared to patients without dizziness. A high proportion of patients in both groups reported clinically relevant improvement on the PGIC scale. At 6 months after start of chiropractic treatment there were no differences in any outcome measures between the two groups.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 036707956

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 23295018

DOI: 10.1186/2045-709x-21-3


Related references

Outcomes of pregnant patients with low back pain undergoing chiropractic treatment: a prospective cohort study with short term, medium term and 1 year follow-up. Chiropractic and Manual Therapies 22(1): 15, 2014

The benefits outweigh the risks for patients undergoing chiropractic care for neck pain: a prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 30(6): 408-418, 2007

Exploring the definition of «acute» neck pain: a prospective cohort observational study comparing the outcomes of chiropractic patients with 0-2 weeks, 2-4 weeks and 4-12 weeks of symptoms. Chiropractic and Manual Therapies 25: 24, 2017

Predictors of short- and long-term outcome in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain undergoing an exercise-based rehabilitation program: a prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up. Internal and Emergency Medicine 6(5): 413-421, 2011

A randomized trial of chiropractic and medical care for patients with low back pain: eighteen-month follow-up outcomes from the UCLA low back pain study. Spine 31(6): 611-21; Discussion 622, 2006

Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation in chronic neck pain: a naturalistic prospective cohort study with intraindividual control of effects and 12-month follow-up. European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 55(5): 665-675, 2019

Cost and effectiveness analysis of chiropractic and physiotherapy treatment for low back and neck pain. Six-month follow-up. Spine 22(18): 2167-2177, 1997

Comparison of treatment outcomes in severe personality disorder patients with or without substance use disorders: a 36-month prospective pragmatic follow-up study. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 12: 1477-1487, 2016

Diagnosis, treatment and follow up of women undergoing conscious pain mapping for chronic pelvic pain: a prospective cohort study. Bjog 113(7): 792-796, 2006

Exploring the Definition of Acute Low Back Pain: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study Comparing Outcomes of Chiropractic Patients With 0-2, 2-4, and 4-12 Weeks of Symptoms. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 39(3): 141-149, 2018

Comparison of treatment outcomes in neck pain patients depending on the sex of the chiropractor: a prospective outcome study. Chiropractic and Manual Therapies 25: 18, 2017

A randomized trial of chiropractic manipulation and mobilization for patients with neck pain: clinical outcomes from the UCLA neck-pain study. American Journal of Public Health 92(10): 1634-1641, 2002

Comparison of Long-term Outcomes in Patients with Premature Triple-vessel Coronary Disease Undergoing Three Different Treatment Strategies: A Prospective Cohort Study. Chinese Medical Journal 131(1): 1-9, 2018

Associations between pain coping and opioid use: One-month follow-up results of a prospective study in a cohort of traumatic injury patients. Journal of Opioid Management 14(3): 159-163, 2018

Adverse reactions to chiropractic treatment and their effects on satisfaction and clinical outcomes among patients enrolled in the UCLA Neck Pain Study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 27(6): 430; Author Reply 430, 2004