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Degradation and mineralization of azo dye reactive blue 222 by sequential Photo-Fenton's oxidation followed by aerobic biological treatment using white rot fungi


Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 90(2): 208-215
Degradation and mineralization of azo dye reactive blue 222 by sequential Photo-Fenton's oxidation followed by aerobic biological treatment using white rot fungi
A two stage sequential Photo-Fenton s oxidation followed by aerobic biological treatment using two white rot fungi P. ostreatus IBL-02 (PO) and P. chrysosporium IBL-03 (PC) was performed to check decolorization and to enhance mineralization of azo dye Reactive Blue 222 (RB222). In the first stage, selected dye was subjected to Photo-Fenton s oxidation with decolorization percentage ?90 % which was further increased to 96.88 % and 95.23 % after aerobic treatment using two white rot fungi P. ostreatus IBL-02 (PO) and P. chrysosporium IBL-03 (PC), respectively. Mineralization efficiency was accessed by measuring the water quality assurance parameters like COD, TOC, TSS and Phenolics estimation. Reduction in COD, TOC, TSS and Phenolics were found to be 95.34 %, 90.11 %, 90.84 % and 92.22 %, respectively in two stage sequential processes. The degradation products were characterized by UV visible and FTIR spectral techniques and their toxicity was measured. The results provide evidence that both fungal strains were able to oxidize and mineralize the selected azo dye into non-toxic metabolites.

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Accession: 036737674

PMID: 23272326

DOI: 10.1007/s00128-012-0888-0



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