+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Gravity constraints on the subsurface structure of the Marius Hills The magmatic plumbing of the largest lunar volcanic dome complex



Gravity constraints on the subsurface structure of the Marius Hills The magmatic plumbing of the largest lunar volcanic dome complex







The Marius Hills, the Moon's largest volcanic dome field, has more than 250 basaltic domes and cones in an area 200 250?km across. It is a major free-air gravity anomaly, 236?mGal in the north and 150?mGal in the south. In the northern half of the structure, the topography can only explain about half of the gravity anomaly, and in the south, there is virtually no topographic relief associated with the gravity anomaly. High-density material must be present at depth, most likely as mare basalt intruded into the underlying porous feldspathic highland crust. The gravity anomaly is modeled using two spherical caps. The northern cap is 160 180?km in diameter and at least 3.0?km thick. The southern cap is 100 140?km in diameter and at least 6.2?km thick. The intruded basalt may have served as the magma chambers that fed the overlying surface volcanism. Magma crystallization within these chambers provided a source of crystal-rich, high viscosity lava that fed the volcanic domes. The volume of intruded basalt is 1.6 104?km3. The total volcanic volume, including both intruded and extruded material, is 2.6 104?km3, indicating that the Marius Hills is a major volcanic center. Intrusion of hot magma may cause thermal annealing of the porous feldspathic host rock, significantly reducing the host rock porosity. This would allow a large volume of magma to be intruded into the crust with little change in overall crustal volume.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 036851286

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1029/2012je004111


Related references

Gravity constraints on the subsurface structure of the Marius Hills; a sharper view of the magmatic pluming system based on improved topography data and new lunar density measurements. Abstracts of Papers Submitted to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 41: 1274, 2010

Gravity constraints on the structure of the Marius Hills and Aristarchus Plateau volcanic fields, the Moon. Geological Society of America 40.6, 2008

Diversity of lunar volcanic eruptions at the Marius Hills Complex. Abstracts of Papers Submitted to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 29(1998, 1998

Spectral properties of the Marius Hills volcanic complex and implications for the formation of lunar domes and cones. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets 104(E8): 18933-18956, 1999

Rumker Hills: a lunar volcanic dome complex. The Moon 10(2): 175-181, 1974

Morphometric, rheological and compositional analysis of an effusive lunar dome using high resolution remote sensing data sets: A case study from Marius hills region. Advances in Space Research 54(10): 2073-2086, 2014

The Marius Hills volcanic complex; a stratigraphic study. Abstracts of Papers Submitted to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 30(Pages (unpaginated, 1999

Compositional variability of the Marius Hills volcanic complex from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper M3. Journal of Geophysical Research 116.E, 2011

The Marius Hills volcanic complex as viewed by the Galileo multi-spectral imaging system. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union 74(16, Suppl, 1993

Geochemical evidence for complex magmatic plumbing during development of a continental volcanic center. Geology 13(8): 581-584, 1985

Magnetic characteristics of fracture zones and constraints on the subsurface structure of the Colima volcanic complex, western Mexico. Geosphere 6.1, 2010

Complex plumbing of monogenetic scoria cones New insights from the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field Nevada, USA. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 239-240(none), 2012

A lava dome simultaneously erupted from the different magmatic plumbing systems; the Hanareyama lava dome of Asama Volcano. Japan Geoscience Union Meeting, 2008

Lava tubes and channels in the lunar Marius Hills. The Moon 3(3): 289-314, 1971

Morphometric and rheological analysis of an effusive dome in Marius Hills using Chandrayaan-1 TMC data. Abstracts of Papers Submitted to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference 42: 1470, 2011