EurekaMag
+ Translate
+ Most Popular
Cunninghamia lanceolata plantations in China
Mammalian lairs in paleo ecological studies and palynology
Studies on technological possibilities in utilization of anhydrous milk fat for production of recombined butter-like products
Should right-sided fibroelastomas be operated upon?
Large esophageal lipoma
Apoptosis in the mammalian thymus during normal histogenesis and under various in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions
Poissons characoides nouveaux ou non signales de l'Ilha do Bananal, Bresil
Desensitizing efficacy of Colgate Sensitive Maximum Strength and Fresh Mint Sensodyne dentifrices
Administration of fluid by subcutaneous infusion: revival of a forgotten method
Tundra mosquito control - an impossible dream?
Schizophrenia for primary care providers: how to contribute to the care of a vulnerable patient population
Geochemical pattern analysis; method of describing the Southeastern limestone regional aquifer system
Incidence of low birth weights in a hospital of Mexico City
Tabanidae
Graded management intensity of grassland systems for enhancing floristic diversity
Microbiology and biochemistry of cheese and fermented milk
The ember tetra: a new pygmy characid tetra from the Rio das Mortes, Brazil, Hyphessobrycon amandae sp. n. (Pisces, Characoidei)
Risk factors of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients after coronary artery intervention
Renovation of onsite domestic wastewater in a poorly drained soil
Observations of the propagation velocity and formation mechanism of burst fractures caused by gunshot
Systolic blood pressure in a population of infants in the first year of life: the Brompton study
Haematological studies in rats fed with metanil yellow
Studies on pasteurellosis. I. A new species of Pasteurella encountered in chronic fowl cholera
Dormancy breaking and germination of Acacia salicina Lindl. seeds
therapy of lupus nephritis. a two-year prospective study

Comparison of the lipid properties of captive, healthy wild, and pansteatitis-affected wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus)


Comparison of the lipid properties of captive, healthy wild, and pansteatitis-affected wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus)



Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A Molecular and Integrative Physiology 155(1): 64-69



ISSN/ISBN: 1095-6433

PMID: 19800020

DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.09.025

The results presented describe and compare the fatty acid composition and melting properties of captive, healthy wild, and pansteatitis-affected wild crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). Differences in fatty acid composition between intramuscular and adipose fat is noted in captive crocodiles, and the latter differs from wild crocodiles as a result of different diets. Adipose fat of healthy wild crocodiles differs minimally from diseased ones, respectively with 37.3+/-2.6% vs. 43.2+/-2.3% monounsaturated fatty acids, and 43.2+/-2.9% in dead crocodiles, while polyunsaturated fatty acids decrease from 27.3+/-1.9% to as low as 21.9+/-3.6% respectively. Of the unsaturated fatty acids 18:2n-6 decreased from 6.5+/-2.6% in unaffected crocodiles to 3.5+/-0.6% in highly affected and 3.2+/-0.4% in dead crocodiles, and 22:5n-3 from 2.8+/-0.6% to 1.8+/-0.3% and 2.2+/-0.3% respectively. The melting properties as determined by differential scanning calorimetry show that extracted adipose fat is a small degree softer in pansteatitis-affected tissue, specifically in the temperature range 7-36 degrees C, and does not contribute to the hard texture noted for adipose fat tissue of pansteatitis-affected animals. A high moisture content of 51.0+/-19.7% of the fat tissue of pansteatitis-affected animals vs.17.1+/-8.0% of healthy ones, suggests that physiological changes due to interstitial inflammation may contribute to the hard texture.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 037405048

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

Related references

Comparison of the Lipid Composition of Three Adipose Tissue Types of Male and Female Wild Nile Crocodiles ( Crocodylus niloticus ). Journal of Herpetology 48(4): 525-531, 2014

Levels of DDTs and other organochlorine pesticides in healthy wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) from a flagship conservation area. Chemosphere 264(Part 1): 128368, 2021

Trichinella zimbabwensis in wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) of South Africa. Veterinary Parasitology 161(1-2): 88-91, 2009

Normal intestinal flora of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 79(2): 67-70, 2008

Osteoarthropathy of unknown aetiology in the long bones of farmed and wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 84(1): 1-5, 2013

Normal haematology and blood biochemistry of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 78(3): 137-144, 2007

Accumulation of organochlorine pesticides in fat tissue of wild Nile crocodiles ( Crocodylus niloticus ) from iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa. Chemosphere 195: 463-471, 2018

Accumulation of organochlorine pesticides in fat tissue of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) from iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa. Chemosphere 195: 463-471, 2018

Plasma fatty acid composition in wild and captive Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A Comparative Physiology 104(2): 373-376, 1993

Recovery rates, serotypes, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of salmonellae isolated from cloacal swabs of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in Zimbabwe. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians 29(1): 31-34, 1998

Xylazine and ketamine anaesthesia in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). Tropical Veterinarian, 43-4: 139-142, 1986

Xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in captive nile crocodiles crocodylus niloticus. Tropical Veterinarian 4(3-4): 139-142, 1986

Non-invasive assessment of adrenocortical function in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A Molecular and Integrative Physiology 177: 11-17, 2014

Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus, and estuarine crocodiles, Crocodylus porosus, show similar osmoregulatory responses on exposure to seawater. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. A Comparative Physiology 89(3): 443-448, 1988

Microbial flora of frozen tail meat from captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). International Journal of Food Microbiology 18(1): 71-76, 1993