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Causes, characteristics and consequences of non-indigenous amphipod species dispersal in aquatic ecosystems of Europe






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Causes, characteristics and consequences of non-indigenous amphipod species dispersal in aquatic ecosystems of Europe



Accession: 038054570



Related references

Khalanski, M., 1997: Industrial and ecological consequences of the introduction of new species in continental aquatic ecosystems the zebra mussel and other invasive species Consequences industrielles et ecologiques de lintroduction de nouvelles especes dans les hydrosystemes continentaux la moule zebree et autres especes invasives. Bulletin Francais de la Peche et de la Pisciculture, 344-345: 385-404

Khalanski, M., 1997: Industrial and ecological consequences of the introduction of new species in continental aquatic ecosystems: The zebra mussel and other invasive species. Surface water is withdrawn from rivers for various industrial uses; among these, power production accounts for a large proportion. Many aquatic species settle in the raw water circuits of power plants, disrupting their operation and occasionally p...

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Chadwick, M.J.; Kuylenstierna, J.C.I., 1991: The relative sensitivity of ecosystems in Europe to acidic depositions. A preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. It is widely accepted that reductions in the emissions of sulfur and nitrogen are required. Initial attempts at reductions centred on flat rate reductions. A new approach is to link the emission-abatement strategy with the capacity of ecosystems t...

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