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Sclerostomes of the donkey in Zanzibar and East Africa






Parasitology Cambridge, 12 27-32

Sclerostomes of the donkey in Zanzibar and East Africa

Two collections of helminths were received for study by the author, each of which included a number of nematodes from the donkey. The first of these collections was obtained from ADERS (W. M.), Economic Biologist of the Zanzibar Government, and the second from MONTGOMERY (R. E.), late of the Veterinary Pathological Laboratory, Nairobi, British East Africa. Nine species were observed including two hitherto undescribed: - 1. Strongylus vulgaris (Looss). 2. Strongylus edentatus (Looss). 3. Strgngylus asini, sp. n. 4. Triodontophorus intermedius Sweet. 5. Cylicostomum auriculatum (Looss). 6. Cylicostomum coronatum (Looss). 7. Cylicostomum bicoronatum (Looss). 8. Cylicostomum alveatum (Looss). 9. Cylicostomum adersi sp. n. The worms numbered 1 to 3 were found in both collections, Nos. 4 to 8 were found in the East African collection only, while No. 9 was found in the Zanzibar collection only. The newly-described species Strongylus asini was found in a cyst of the liver and in the caecum of the donkey from Zanzibar, and in the caecum of the donkey from Nairobi. The species was a large form, 18 to 42 mm. long by 1.8 to 2.5 mm. in maximum breadth and it seems to occupy a position intermediate between Strongylus equinus (Looss) and S. edentatus (Looss). The rays of the bursa were similar to those of the latter species, i.e., they were more slender than those of S. equinus. The branches of the posterior rays differed from those of the other species in that the inner dorsal branch was simple and the external branch divided, that is, the converse of the arrangement prevailing in the genus. Cylicostomum adersi, represented by a single male specimen only, found in the caecum of a donkey from Zanzibar, appeared to be closely allied to C. insigne, but was distinguishable from this worm by the character of its genital appendages, by the number and shape of the leaves of the internal leaf-crown and the presence of a highly chitinized oesophageal funnel.

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Accession: 038632282

DOI: 10.1017/s0031182000013986



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