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An evaluation of male contraceptive acceptance in rural Ghana



An evaluation of male contraceptive acceptance in rural Ghana



Studies in Family Planning 9(8): 222-226



Report of a follow-up survey of male family planning acceptors in the Danfa program. A sample of 100 men from each of 3 project areas (representing 47% of all male acceptors as of July 1974) was obtained, with 227 acceptors ultimately interviewed. A sample of female acceptors was also interviewed, using a similar questionnaire. 84% of the males were between ages 20-44. The mean age for the sampled females was 29. 19% of the males and 5% of the females reported ever using contraception before accepting it from the program. 80% of males were literate and 39% of females, the importance of literacy for males further underscored by the fact that while only 36% of their spouses were literate, the female respondents claimed 72% of their spouses to be literate. Controlling for other factors, religion was also important, with Christians most likely to accept family planning. 70% of male acceptors were married at the time of acceptance and 25% of those unmarried at time of acceptance were married by the time of the interview. 76% had at least one living child. 55% of the married men and 44% of the unmarried men claimed to have only one sexual partner. 78% of married men claimed to have discussed family planning with their wives. 66% reported that they used the accepted method only with their wives, 20% only with the other partner, and 12% with both partners. The most common reason given for acceptance was the health of their children. 52% of the male acceptors had first learned about family planning from the project health staff and 24% through mass media. 64% of the male respondents reported having tried to persuade another to accept family planning, compared with 40% of the females. Half of the men had chosen the condom, and half contraceptive foam for their partners. 16% of foam and 6% of condom acceptors had never used the methods. The large number of foam acceptors and users indicates the important role of males in acceptance of family planning. Self reporting indicated 81% of acceptors used their methods correctly. Continuation rates were higher for the male acceptors surveyed than for the women, which may be a reflection of their extra- and pre-marital relations. Among those not continuing, the major reasons were the desire for a child (28%) and inability to get supplies (18%). Accidental pregnancies were fewer among the partners of the male respondents than among women in the project in general, and the extended use-effectiveness was greater. These again may reflect the extra-marital and pre-marital sexual activities.

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Accession: 039246384

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 715833

DOI: 10.2307/1965867


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