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Beta-endorphin alters the course of central nervous system disease induced by a temperature-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus in reconstituted nude mice



Beta-endorphin alters the course of central nervous system disease induced by a temperature-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus in reconstituted nude mice



Journal of Neuroimmunology 28(1): 73-82



A 100 plaque forming unit (pfu) dose of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), tsG31 KS5, engendered a slowly progressive paralytic central nervous system (CNS) disease that killed all BALB/c nude mice within 28 days. Reconstitution of nude mice with 10(7) syngeneic splenocytes 24 h before intracerebral inoculation with tsG31 KS5 VSV, however, protected 92% of the animals from death. When these reconstituted animals were injected intracerebroventricularly with 14 pmol of beta-endorphin 24 h after reconstitution with splenocytes and 24 h before inoculation with tsG31 KS5 VSV, only 72% of the animals survived. Furthermore, whereas 40% of the afflicted reconstituted nude mice given intracerebroventricular injections of sterile water were able to recover from the symptoms of disease, those surviving animals which received beta-endorphin were unable to do so. A single intravenous injection of 14 pmol beta-endorphin, or repeated postinfection administration of 28 pmol of beta-endorphin intravenously into nude mice reconstituted with syngeneic splenocytes, which were pretreated with beta-endorphin, did not alter the course of CNS disease induced by tsG31 KS5 VSV. The effect induced by intracerebroventricular injection of beta-endorphin was antagonized by naloxone, but not by the neuropeptide fragment beta-endorphin-(1-27). A simultaneous intracerebroventricular injection of reconstituted nude mice with 1220 pmol of naloxone and 14 pmol of beta-endorphin resulted in a 89% survival rate, and 33% of the afflicted animals were able to overcome the symptoms of the disease induced by tsG31 KS5 VSV. Intracerebroventricular injection of reconstituted nude mice with 330 pmol of beta-endorphin-(1-27) and 14 pmol of beta-endorphin resulted in a 72% survival rate and the surviving animals were unable to improve appreciably the clinical status of their disease. Injection of reconstituted nude mice with either 1220 pmol of naloxone or 330 pmol of beta-endorphin-(1-27) alone did not alter the course of the CNS disease in any way. A single intracerebroventricular injection of 29 pmol of another psychoactive peptide, [Des-Tyr]-endorphin, 24 h after reconstitution of nude mice with splenocytes and 24 h prior to infection with virus, resulted in 74% survival; and 39% of the afflicted animals were able to recover from the clinical symptoms.

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Accession: 039381352

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PMID: 2160476


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