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Calcium glycerophosphate as a source of calcium and phosphorus in total parenteral nutrition solutions



Calcium glycerophosphate as a source of calcium and phosphorus in total parenteral nutrition solutions



Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 15(2): 176-180



Calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) was tested as an alternative to calcium gluconate (CaGluc) and potassium mono- and dibasic phosphate (KPhos) as a source of Ca and P in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions for piglets. Four-day-old piglets were infused for 7 days with a TPN solution that provided either 4.2 mmol Ca and 2.1 mmol P/kg/24 h as CaGluc and KPhos (the maximum quantities that can be provided using these sources), or 15.0 mmol Ca and 15.0 mmol P/kg/24 h as CaGP. Ca and P retentions were more than six times greater (p less than 0.01) in the piglets receiving CaGP (14.5 +/- 0.2 vs 2.2 +/- 0.3 mmol Ca/kg/24 h and 13.3 +/- 0.4 vs 2.4 +/- 0.1 mmol P/kg/24 h) (Mean +/- SEM). The ratio of Ca to fat-free dry weight, an indicator of bone mineralization, was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in the humerus (174.8 +/- 2.2 vs 147.2 +/- 6.7) and femur (158.3 +/- 4.8 vs 130.1 +/- 7.8) in the CaGP group. This study showed that CaGP is efficiently used as a source of Ca and P in TPN solutions for piglets. The results suggest that the use of CaGP as the source of Ca and P in TPN solutions may prevent the development of the undermineralized bone seen in low-birth weight infants nourished intravenously.

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Accession: 039441401

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 1904952

DOI: 10.1177/0148607191015002176


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