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Comodulation masking release as a function of bandwidth and time delay between on-frequency and flanking-band maskers



Comodulation masking release as a function of bandwidth and time delay between on-frequency and flanking-band maskers



Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 88(2): 725-731



The threshold for a signal masked by a narrow band of noise centered at the signal frequency (the on-frequency band) may be reduced by adding to the masker a second band of noise (the flanking band) whose envelope is correlated with that of the first band, an effect called comodulation masking release (CMR). This paper examines CMR as a function of masker bandwidth and time delay between the envelopes of the on-frequency and flanking bands. The 1.0-kHz sinusoidal signal had a duration of 400 ms. The on-frequency band was presented alone (reference condition) or with the flanking band. The flanking-band envelope was either correlated or uncorrelated with that of the on-frequency band. Flanking-band center frequencies ranged from 0.25-2.0 kHz. The flanking band was presented either in the same ear as the on-frequency band (monaural condition) or in the opposite ear (dichotic condition). The noise bands had bandwidths of 6.25, 25, or 100 Hz. In the correlated conditions, the flanking-band envelope was delayed with respect to that of the on-frequency band by 0, 5, 10, or 20 ms. For the 100-Hz bandwidth, CMRs were small (typically less than 1 dB) in both monaural and dichotic conditions at all delay times. For the 25-Hz bandwidth, CMRs were about 3.5 dB for the 0-ms delay, and decreased to about 1.5 dB for the 20-ms delay. For the 6.25-Hz bandwidth, CMRs averaged about 5 dB and were almost independent of delay time. The results suggest that the absolute delay time is not the critical variable determining CMR. The magnitude of CMR appears to depend on the correlation between the envelopes of the on-frequency and flanking bands. However, the results do not support a model of CMR that assumes that signal threshold corresponds to a constant change in across-band envelope correlation when the correlation is transformed to Fisher's z.

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Accession: 039614115

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 2212296

DOI: 10.1121/1.399775


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