Conjugates of colloidal gold with native and acetylated low density lipoproteins for ultrastructural investigations on receptor-mediated endocytosis by cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages

Mommaas-Kienhuis, A.M.; van der Schroeff, J.G.; Wijsman, M.C.; Daems, W.T.; Vermeer, B.J.

Histochemistry 83(1): 29-35

1985


ISSN/ISBN: 0301-5564
PMID: 4044300
DOI: 10.1007/bf00495296
Accession: 039665649

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Abstract
The morphological aspects of the binding and internalization of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and acetylated low density lipoproteins (AcLDL) by cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages were investigated. For this purpose, LDL and AcLDL were conjugated to 20 nm colloidal gold particles. After incubation of the cells with the conjugated lipoproteins at 4 degrees C some LDL- or AcLDL-gold complexes were found to be attached to the cell surface, but without characteristic localization. However, after incubation of the cells at 8 degrees C with either LDL-gold or AcLDL-gold, lipoprotein-gold complexes were present in clusters on the plasma membrane, often in coated pits. Cells incubated at 37 degrees C for various time periods showed internalization of both LDL- and AcLDL-gold complexes via small coated and non-coated vesicles and processing of the complexes in smooth-walled endosomes. When the cells were pulse-chased with LDL- or AcLDL-gold for 30 min at 37 degrees C, the gold conjugates occurred in dense bodies, probably lysosomes. The results suggest that although native and modified LDL are reported to be metabolized differently by macrophages, the morphological aspects of the endocytosis of LDL and AcLDL by cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages are similar.

Conjugates of colloidal gold with native and acetylated low density lipoproteins for ultrastructural investigations on receptor-mediated endocytosis by cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages