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Dyspnea and ventilatory muscle function during exercise on air and oxygen breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)



Dyspnea and ventilatory muscle function during exercise on air and oxygen breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)



Nihon Kyobu Shikkan Gakkai Zasshi 30(6): 1116-1124



Exercise performance and dyspnea in COPD patients have been shown to be improved with supplemental oxygen, although the exact mechanisms resulting in the improvement are still unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a possible relationship between ventilatory muscle function and sensation of dyspnea (modified Borg Scale) during exercise on 20% O2 and 30% O2. Eight patients with COPD (FEV1 1.06 L +/- 0.30 L) exercised on a treadmill two times breathing compressed air or 30% oxygen with a one hour rest in between. The electrical activity of the diaphragm (EMGdi) was recorded with esophageal electrodes, and that of the sternomastoid muscle (EMGsm) was recorded from the fine wire electrodes. The ratio of high frequency (150 to 350 Hz) to low frequency (20 to 47 Hz) power (H/L) of EMGdi was analyzed to assess diaphragmatic fatigue, which was defined as a 20% fall of H/L ratio from the control value. Flow, volume, O2 Saturation (SaO2), esophageal pressure (Pes) and transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) were measured. Tension time index (TTdi) was calculated from Pdi and the ratio of inspiratory time to total time for one cycle (Ti/Ttot). At rest, we measured maximal esophageal pressure (Pesmax), maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdimax), maximal integrated EMGdi (EMGdimax) and EMGsm (EMGsmmax). Incremental exercise was discontinued by dyspnea. The walking distance achieved was increased in all patients on 30% O2. Dyspnea and desaturation were significantly improved on 30% O2 breathing, and the onset of diaphragmatic fatigue was delayed.

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Accession: 039884120

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PMID: 1507686


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