EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Fears of institutionalized mentally retarded adults



Fears of institutionalized mentally retarded adults



Journal of Psychology 101(1st Half): 67-71



The patterns of fears of institutionalized mentally retarded adults were studied in a sample of i2 moderately retarded men and women between the ages of 21-49. The direct questioning method was employed. Two interviews were held, two weeks apart; the first interview elicited the Ss' fears, while the second concerned the fears of their friends. A total of 146 responses were obtained, and these were categorized according to the types of fears: supernatural-natural events, animals, physical injury, psychological stress, egocentric responses, and no fears. The Ss displayed a higher percentage of fears in the preoperational stage than in the concrete operational stage. In a comparison of male to female fears, only one category, that of fears of animals, reached significance. The study suggested that the same developmental trend of fears that appears in normal children appears in the retarded as well, and these fears follow Piaget's level of cognitive development, proceeding from egocentric perceptions of causality to realistic cause and effect thinking.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 040135427

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 759622

DOI: 10.1080/00223980.1979.9915053



Related references

Fears in mental retardation: Part twoPrevalence of fears reported by mentally retarded and non-mentally retarded adults. Advances in Behaviour Research and Therapy 16(4): 297-306, 1994

Fears in mental retardation Part two Prevalence of fears reported by mentally retarded and non-mentally retarded adults. Advances in Behaviour Research & Therapy 16(4): 297-306, 1994 ( ), 1996

DSM-III diagnoses compared with factor structure of the psychopathology instrument for mentally retarded adults (PIMRA), in an institutionalized, mostly severely retarded population. Research in Developmental Disabilities 12(2): 143-153, 1991

Psychopathology in institutionalized mentally retarded adults. British Journal of Psychiatry 156(APR): 522-525, 1990

Patterns of weight disorders in institutionalized mentally retarded adults. Nutrition reports international 21(4): 469-477, 1980

Effects of success and failure with institutionalized mentally retarded adults. Psychological Reports 18(3): 779-782, 1966

Association of weight and overactivity in institutionalized mentally retarded adults. Perceptual and Motor Skills 49(1): 241-242, 1979

Time-out and the characteristics of mentally retarded institutionalized adults who do or do not receive it. Mental Retardation 18(4): 181-184, 1980

Vitamin/mineral supplements and intelligence of institutionalized mentally retarded adults. American Journal of Mental Deficiency 88(2): 211-214, 1983

Seroepidemiologic study of toxocariasis and strongyloidiasis in institutionalized mentally retarded adults. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 46(3): 278-281, 1992

Teaching institutionalized mentally retarded adults socially appropriate leisure skills. Mental Retardation 18(5): 249-252, 1980

Verbal interaction patterns of depressed and nondepressed institutionalized mentally retarded adults. Applied Research in Mental Retardation 3(1): 1-12, 1982

Hand test personality correlates of aging in institutionalized mentally retarded adults. Perceptual and Motor Skills 57(3 Pt 1): 1021-1022, 1983

Personality stability of institutionalized mentally retarded adults as measured by the Hand Test. Journal of Clinical Psychology 47(3): 436-439, 1991

Learning concepts through modeling: using different instructional procedures with institutionalized mentally retarded adults. American Journal of Mental Deficiency 82(3): 287-291, 1977