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Five years of angiographic and clinical follow-up after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty



Five years of angiographic and clinical follow-up after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty



European Heart Journal 10 Suppl G: 42-48



The first 67 consecutive patients (77 lesions) who underwent successful coronary angioplasty (PTCA) at our hospital were clinically followed with serial exercise testing over a 5-year (4 to 7) observation period. Two sequential angiographic controls were performed 6.9 +/- 4.6 (64 patients) and 49.5 +/- 21.6 (42 patients) months after PTCA. The 5-year risk of cardiac death was 8%, of myocardial infarction 2%, or coronary artery bypass grafting 16% and of repeat PTCA 8%. At 5 years, 67% of the patients remain asymptomatic. Restenosis greater than or equal to 70% diameter was observed within the first year after PTCA in 30% of the patients. Progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) was observed in 13 patients (20%). In the first angiographic control, CAD progression was 4% (3/77) in dilated and 3% (3/115) in non-dilated arteries (ns). In the second angiographic control, it was 7% (3/45) and 10% (8/81), respectively (ns). Thus good clinical and angiographic results are still observed after 5 years. Restenosis is an early, self-limited, time-restricted phenomenon that occurs in 30% of patients. Angioplasty does not appear to accelerate CAD progression.

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Accession: 040150981

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PMID: 2627948

DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/10.suppl_g.42


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