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Liver mevalonate 5-pyrophosphate decarboxylase is responsible for reduced serum cholesterol in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat



Liver mevalonate 5-pyrophosphate decarboxylase is responsible for reduced serum cholesterol in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat



Journal of Biological Chemistry 267(9): 6051-6055



Spontaneously hypertensive rat (stroke-prone) (SHRSP) has an interestingly low serum cholesterol level due to a reduced biosynthesis of cholesterol in the liver (Iritani, N., Fukuda, E., Nara, Y., and Yamori, Y. (1977) Atherosclerosis 28, 217-222). In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying the reduction of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis in the rat. Our initial findings in SHRSP, as compared with normotensive Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY), showed that 1) the incorporation of [14C]acetate into cholesterol in the liver slices was markedly less, 2) 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase activity was not reduced, and 3) the incorporation of [3H]mevalonic acid into both cholesterol and squalene was significantly less. The above initial findings suggested that the reduction in the hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis took place in one or more enzymatic processes starting with mevalonic acid and continuing to squalene. When the incorporation of [3H]mevalonic acid into phosphomevalonate derivatives was studied using an ion exchange column, only the radioactivity incorporated into isopentenyl-pyrophosphate (isopentenyl-PP) was less in SHRSP. Furthermore, the specific activity of diphosphomevalonate (mevalonate-PP) decarboxylase in the liver-soluble fractions was reduced 50% in SHRSP as compared with WKY. Kinetic studies using liver crude extracts indicated a lower Vmax value in SHRSP (SHRSP, 0.47; WKY, 2.05 nmol/min/mg), and an unchanged Km value (SHRSP, 18.2; WKY, 19.6 microM). The activity of mevalonate-PP decarboxylase was also found to be reduced in other tissues, including the brain, testis, small intestine, and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. From the above observations, we concluded that the lower activity of mevalonate-PP decarboxylase was responsible for the reduced cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of SHRSP.

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Accession: 040586032

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PMID: 1556116


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