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Offense type and two-point MMPI code profiles: discriminating between violent and nonviolent offenders



Offense type and two-point MMPI code profiles: discriminating between violent and nonviolent offenders



Journal of Clinical Psychology 46(6): 774-777



Offense data and MMPI profiles were examined for 67 men who had been remanded by the courts to a psychiatric hospital forensic unit for pretrial assessment. They were classified as violent or nonviolent offenders based upon the nature of their offenses. Violent offenders were those charged with assault, robbery, sexual assault, and all degrees of homicide. Nonviolent offenders were those charged with break, enter and commit, uttering threats, and fraud. The controversial issue of two-point MMPI code types (4-3, 4-8/8-4) was addressed. Neither of these commonly employed two-point types successfully discriminated between violent and nonviolent offenders.

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Accession: 040853594

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 2286669

DOI: 10.1002/1097-4679(199011)46:6<774::aid-jclp2270460612>3.0.co;2-3


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