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Regulation by dietary calcium of vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein and active calcium transport in the small intestine of lactating rats



Regulation by dietary calcium of vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein and active calcium transport in the small intestine of lactating rats



Endocrinology 121(1): 278-283



To test the hypothesis that vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein (CaBP) and active calcium (Ca) transport in the small intestine of vitamin D-replete lactating rats are regulated by dietary Ca intake, pregnant rats were given a high Ca (1.6% Ca and 1.4% phosphorus) or low Ca (0.1% Ca and 0.4% phosphorus) diet starting 3 days before delivery. Toward the end of lactation (days 16-23) the rats were killed, and active Ca transport (using everted gut sacs) and CaBP were determined in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The right tibiae were used for bone weight and ash determinations. The Ca transport ratios and CaBP concentrations in jejunum and ileum were significantly increased only in the low Ca group. In contrast, in the duodenum both parameters were equally high regardless of the diet. Nonlactating rats given the two diets for the same length of time had the expected increase in both parameters in the duodenum when fed the low Ca diet. Nonlactating rats, in contrast to lactating rats, had undetectable CaBP in jejunum and ileum regardless of diet. Lactating rats fed the high Ca diet had no net loss of bone at the end of lactation compared with rats on day 1 of lactation. In contrast, lactating rats fed the low Ca diet had a net loss of 44% of bone weight. Plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] concentrations on the 21st day of lactation were (mean +/- SE) 538 +/- 96 and 46 +/- 18 pg/ml in rats consuming the low and high Ca diets, respectively. The comparable values for the nonlactating rats were 140 +/- 4 and 26 +/- 8 pg/ml. In conclusion, dietary Ca restriction during lactation can stimulate CaBP and active Ca transport in both jejunum and ileum, and both parameters appear to be modulated by dietary Ca via the circulating concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3. In contrast, in the duodenum neither parameter appears to be related to dietary Ca, plasma 1,25-(OH)2D3 concentration, or lactation-associated bone loss.

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Accession: 041208504

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 3595520

DOI: 10.1210/endo-121-1-278



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