The relationship of blood lactate concentrations, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption in septic shock and the adult respiratory distress syndrome

Nimmo, G.R.; Mackenzie, S.J.; Walker, S.W.; Catnach, J.; Nicol, M.; Armstrong, I.R.; Grant, I.S.

Anaesthesia 47(12): 1023-1028

1992


ISSN/ISBN: 0003-2409
PMID: 1489022
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2044.1992.tb04194.x
Accession: 041734422

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Abstract
Tissue hypoxia is thought to be pivotal to the development of multiple organ failure, but cannot be measured directly in clinical practice. We assessed the relationship between initial arterial blood lactate concentrations and the presence of the phenomenon of delivery-dependent oxygen consumption, both of which may indicate tissue hypoxia. Twenty-three critically ill patients with septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome were studied prospectively and allocated to one of two groups according to blood lactate concentrations. In group 1, blood lactate concentration was less than the level widely accepted as significant (2 mmol.l-1); in group 2, the concentration exceeded 2 mmol.l-1. In both groups, resuscitation with colloid, blood and vasoactive drugs resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery; in group 1 (n = 13), mean (SEM) oxygen delivery increased from 484 (36) to 730 (44) ml.min-1.m-2 (p < 0.005) and in group 2 (n = 10) from 550 (54) to 780 (54) ml.min-1.m-2 (p < 0.05). In neither group was there a significant change in oxygen consumption. However, there were individuals in both groups who exhibited pathological delivery dependence. This suggests that the absence of hyperlactataemia does not preclude delivery dependence of oxygen consumption with the attendant potential for tissue hypoxia.

The relationship of blood lactate concentrations, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption in septic shock and the adult respiratory distress syndrome