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Gender differences in attitudes and use of condom availability programs among sexually active students in New York City public high schools



Gender differences in attitudes and use of condom availability programs among sexually active students in New York City public high schools



Journal of the American Medical Women's Association 50(3-4): 99-102



In 1991, the New York City Board of Education expanded HIV/AIDS education to include condom availability in public high schools. A three-year study was initiated to assess the program's impact on student risk behavior, the schools' social environments, and patterns of communication about HIV/AIDS and condoms among students, their parents and teachers in 12 randomly selected New York City high schools. Findings on gender differences in both attitudes and use of the program among sexually active students are reported here. Sexually active girls' attitudes toward using condoms and the condom availability program were more positive than those of sexually active boys, yet boys were more likely to have used the program. Girls reported embarrassment and confidentiality concerns as the main deterrents to using the program. Data suggest that schools need to examine the address gender-specific attitudes that contribute to reluctance to use the program among sexually active girls.

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Accession: 043182724

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PMID: 7657958



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