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Lesions in the small intestine of newborn pigs inoculated with porcine, feline, and canine coronaviruses



Lesions in the small intestine of newborn pigs inoculated with porcine, feline, and canine coronaviruses



American Journal of Veterinary Research 42(7): 1163-1169



The infectivity and pathogenicity to newborn pigs of antigenically related coronaviruses from pigs (transmissible gastroenteritis virus; TGEV), cats (feline infectious peritonitis virus; FIPV), and dogs (canine gastroenteritis virus; CGEV) were studied by light, scanning electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Hysterectomy-derived, 12-hour-old pigs were orally given tissue culture or frozen preparations of 6 coronavirus strains (3 porcine, 2 feline, and 1 canine). The pigs were killed at regular intervals between 24 and 144 hours after exposure. Virulent TGEV and virulent FIPV produced necrosis of villous epithelium, resulting in villous atrophy in the jejunum and the ileum. Similar, but less extensive and severe lesions, were produced by the 4 other viruses. Coronaviral antigens were identified by immunofluorescence in villous epithelial cells of pigs that had been inoculated with virulent TGEV, attenuated TGEV, virulent FIPV, and tissue culture-adapted FIPV. In contrast, coronaviral antigens were not induced by the small plaque variant TGEV and virulent CGEV in the villous epithelium, but rather in cells of the lamina propria and crypt epithelium.

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Accession: 043526031

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PMID: 6168221


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